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Now solved: For 916, transform the sum or difference to a product of sines and/or

Precalculus with Trigonometry: Concepts and Applications | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9781559533911 | Authors: Foerster ISBN: 9781559533911 468

Solution for problem 12 Chapter 5-5

Precalculus with Trigonometry: Concepts and Applications | 1st Edition

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Precalculus with Trigonometry: Concepts and Applications | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9781559533911 | Authors: Foerster

Precalculus with Trigonometry: Concepts and Applications | 1st Edition

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Problem 12

For 916, transform the sum or difference to a product of sines and/or cosines with positive arguments. sin 3 sin 8

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Philosophy 10/4 Wednesday, October 4, 2017 9:01 AM Utilitarianism What is Utilitarianism • Consequentialist: the outcome or consequences of our actions are more important than our intentions; "future looking" • If the consequences of a particular action is beneficial and produces more good or happiness than harm, then that action or policy is morally acceptable • Utility= happiness/pleasure More basic info… • Aimed at a particular goal: the greatest net happiness (utility) for all • Actions themselves are neither intrinsically right nor wrong • The rightness or wrongness of an action is determined solely by its consequences • Opposite of deontology ○ The ends do justify the means • "He who saves a fellow creature from drowning does what is morally right, whether his motive be from duty or the hope of being paid for his trouble" Hedonism • Our fundamental moral obligation is to maximize pleasure or happiness • Epicurus (341-­‐270 B.C) ○ "Pleasure is our first and kindred good. It is the starting point of every choice and o

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Chapter 5-5, Problem 12 is Solved
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Textbook: Precalculus with Trigonometry: Concepts and Applications
Edition: 1
Author: Foerster
ISBN: 9781559533911

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Now solved: For 916, transform the sum or difference to a product of sines and/or