×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Stats Modeling The World - 4 Edition - Chapter 12 - Problem 41
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Stats Modeling The World - 4 Edition - Chapter 12 - Problem 41

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

Weekend deaths A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine (Aug. 2001)

Stats Modeling the World | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780321854018 | Authors: David E. Bock, Paul F. Velleman, Richard D. De Veaux ISBN: 9780321854018 481

Solution for problem 41 Chapter 12

Stats Modeling the World | 4th Edition

  • Textbook Solutions
  • 2901 Step-by-step solutions solved by professors and subject experts
  • Get 24/7 help from StudySoup virtual teaching assistants
Stats Modeling the World | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780321854018 | Authors: David E. Bock, Paul F. Velleman, Richard D. De Veaux

Stats Modeling the World | 4th Edition

4 5 1 422 Reviews
22
1
Problem 41

Weekend deaths A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine (Aug. 2001) suggests that its dangerous to enter a hospital on a weekend. During a 10-year period, researchers tracked over 4 million emergency admissions to hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Their findings revealed that patients admitted on weekends had a much higher risk of death than those who went on weekdays. a) The researchers said the difference in death rates was statistically significant. Explain in this context what that means. b) What kind of study was this? Explain.c) If you think youre quite ill on a Saturday, should you wait until Monday to seek medical help? Explain. d) Suggest some possible explanations for this troubling finding.

Step-by-Step Solution:
Step 1 of 3

Chapter 2 Section 2.2  Frequency Distribution: Shows how data are parted within different categories(classes)  Lower class Limits: the smallest values in the different classes  Ex: Class interval: 10­19; 26­30; 80­100 Lower Class Limits: 10, 26, and 80  Upper class Limits: the largest values in the different classes.  Ex: Class Interval: 10­19; 26­30; 80­100 Upper Class Limits: 19, 30, and 100  Class Boundaries: The values that are used to separate the classes, not including the gaps created by class limits.  Ex: Class Interval: 10­19; 20­30; 80­100 Class Boundaries: 19+20/2 = 19.5  Class midpoints: the values in the middle o

Step 2 of 3

Chapter 12, Problem 41 is Solved
Step 3 of 3

Textbook: Stats Modeling the World
Edition: 4
Author: David E. Bock, Paul F. Velleman, Richard D. De Veaux
ISBN: 9780321854018

This full solution covers the following key subjects: . This expansive textbook survival guide covers 31 chapters, and 1357 solutions. Since the solution to 41 from 12 chapter was answered, more than 241 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. The answer to “Weekend deaths A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine (Aug. 2001) suggests that its dangerous to enter a hospital on a weekend. During a 10-year period, researchers tracked over 4 million emergency admissions to hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Their findings revealed that patients admitted on weekends had a much higher risk of death than those who went on weekdays. a) The researchers said the difference in death rates was statistically significant. Explain in this context what that means. b) What kind of study was this? Explain.c) If you think youre quite ill on a Saturday, should you wait until Monday to seek medical help? Explain. d) Suggest some possible explanations for this troubling finding.” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 117 words. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Stats Modeling the World, edition: 4. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 41 from chapter: 12 was answered by , our top Statistics solution expert on 03/16/18, 04:57PM. Stats Modeling the World was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321854018.

Other solutions

People also purchased

Related chapters

Unlock Textbook Solution

Enter your email below to unlock your verified solution to:

Weekend deaths A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine (Aug. 2001)