×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Stats Modeling The World - 4 Edition - Chapter 20 - Problem 24
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Stats Modeling The World - 4 Edition - Chapter 20 - Problem 24

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

Spam Spam filters try to sort your e-mails, deciding which are real messages and which

Stats Modeling the World | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780321854018 | Authors: David E. Bock, Paul F. Velleman, Richard D. De Veaux ISBN: 9780321854018 481

Solution for problem 24 Chapter 20

Stats Modeling the World | 4th Edition

  • Textbook Solutions
  • 2901 Step-by-step solutions solved by professors and subject experts
  • Get 24/7 help from StudySoup virtual teaching assistants
Stats Modeling the World | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780321854018 | Authors: David E. Bock, Paul F. Velleman, Richard D. De Veaux

Stats Modeling the World | 4th Edition

4 5 1 287 Reviews
11
2
Problem 24

Spam Spam filters try to sort your e-mails, deciding which are real messages and which are unwanted. One method used is a point system. The filter reads each incoming e-mail and assigns points to the sender, the subject, key words in the message, and so on. The higher the point total, the more likely it is that the message is unwanted. The filter has a cutoff value for the point total; any message rated lower than that cutoff passes through to your inbox, and the rest, suspected to be spam, are diverted to the junk mailbox. We can think of the filters decision as a hypothesis test. The null hypothesis is that the e-mail is a real message and should go to your inbox. A higher point total provides evidence that the message may be spam; when theres sufficient evidence, the filter rejects the null, classifying the message as junk. This usually works pretty well, but, of course, sometimes the filter makes a mistake. a) When the filter allows spam to slip through into your inbox, which kind of error is that? b) Which kind of error is it when a real message gets classified as junk? c) Some filters allow the user (thats you) to adjust the cutoff. Suppose your filter has a default cutoff of 50 points, but you reset it to 60. Is that analogous to choosing a higher or lower value of a for a hypothesis test? Explain. d) What impact does this change in the cutoff value have on the chance of each type of error?

Step-by-Step Solution:
Step 1 of 3

STAT-5615: Statistics in Research I Lecture 7 One-Sample Hypothesis Tests for a Single Mean) Ott & Longnecker 5.4 Dr. Christian Lucero Virginia Tech Fall 2016 Hypothesis Tests for a Single Mean Science is ▯lled with questions/conjectures, and hypotheses about many types of observed phenomena. Examples Is a new medicine more e▯ective than the currently used one Does the patient have cancer Does the current practice meet a particular standard Does this model of car get more than 40 mpg A More Speci▯c Example Before a substance can be deemed safe for land▯lling, its chemical properties must be characterized. In a samp

Step 2 of 3

Chapter 20, Problem 24 is Solved
Step 3 of 3

Textbook: Stats Modeling the World
Edition: 4
Author: David E. Bock, Paul F. Velleman, Richard D. De Veaux
ISBN: 9780321854018

This full solution covers the following key subjects: . This expansive textbook survival guide covers 31 chapters, and 1357 solutions. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 24 from chapter: 20 was answered by , our top Statistics solution expert on 03/16/18, 04:57PM. Stats Modeling the World was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321854018. The answer to “Spam Spam filters try to sort your e-mails, deciding which are real messages and which are unwanted. One method used is a point system. The filter reads each incoming e-mail and assigns points to the sender, the subject, key words in the message, and so on. The higher the point total, the more likely it is that the message is unwanted. The filter has a cutoff value for the point total; any message rated lower than that cutoff passes through to your inbox, and the rest, suspected to be spam, are diverted to the junk mailbox. We can think of the filters decision as a hypothesis test. The null hypothesis is that the e-mail is a real message and should go to your inbox. A higher point total provides evidence that the message may be spam; when theres sufficient evidence, the filter rejects the null, classifying the message as junk. This usually works pretty well, but, of course, sometimes the filter makes a mistake. a) When the filter allows spam to slip through into your inbox, which kind of error is that? b) Which kind of error is it when a real message gets classified as junk? c) Some filters allow the user (thats you) to adjust the cutoff. Suppose your filter has a default cutoff of 50 points, but you reset it to 60. Is that analogous to choosing a higher or lower value of a for a hypothesis test? Explain. d) What impact does this change in the cutoff value have on the chance of each type of error?” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 261 words. Since the solution to 24 from 20 chapter was answered, more than 232 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Stats Modeling the World, edition: 4.

Other solutions

People also purchased

Related chapters

Unlock Textbook Solution

Enter your email below to unlock your verified solution to:

Spam Spam filters try to sort your e-mails, deciding which are real messages and which