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Teen smoking, part I A Vermont study published by the American Academy of Pediatrics

Stats Modeling the World | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780321854018 | Authors: David E. Bock, Paul F. Velleman, Richard D. De Veaux ISBN: 9780321854018 481

Solution for problem 23 Chapter 21

Stats Modeling the World | 4th Edition

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Stats Modeling the World | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780321854018 | Authors: David E. Bock, Paul F. Velleman, Richard D. De Veaux

Stats Modeling the World | 4th Edition

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Problem 23

Teen smoking, part I A Vermont study published by the American Academy of Pediatrics examined parental influence on teenagers decisions to smoke. A group of students who had never smoked were questioned about their parents attitudes toward smoking. These students were questioned again two years later to see if they had started smoking. The researchers found that, among the 284 students who indicated that their parents disapproved of kids smoking, 54 had become established smokers. Among the 41 students who initially said their parents were lenient about smoking, 11 became smokers. Do these data provide strong evidence that parental attitude influences teenagers decisions about smoking? a) What kind of design did the researchers use? b) Write appropriate hypotheses. c) Are the assumptions and conditions necessary for inference satisfied? d) Test the hypothesis and state your conclusion. e) Explain in this context what your P-value means. f) If that conclusion is actually wrong, which type of error did you commit?

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Business Statistics Notes Week 1 & 2: August 23, August 30 Quantitative Data:  Discrete (e.g. number of children)  Continuous (e.g. weight, volume) Qualitative Data: information about qualities; information that can't actually be measured Nominal Data (nomial­names)  Lowest form of data (e.g. comparison)  Nonnumeric label/code  Equality (=) relationship  No meaningful data  (e.g. What is your gender...male, female / What is your hair color...blonde, brown, black, other ) Ordinal Data (numerical)  All characteristics of interval data  Data labels with order  Equality (=) greater, less than ><  No meaningful interval distance  (e.g. How do you feel today..1. very happy 2. Unhappy 3. Okay 4. Happy

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Chapter 21, Problem 23 is Solved
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Textbook: Stats Modeling the World
Edition: 4
Author: David E. Bock, Paul F. Velleman, Richard D. De Veaux
ISBN: 9780321854018

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Teen smoking, part I A Vermont study published by the American Academy of Pediatrics