×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Stats Modeling The World - 4 Edition - Chapter 21 - Problem 39
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Stats Modeling The World - 4 Edition - Chapter 21 - Problem 39

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

NIMBY. In March 2007, the Gallup Poll split a sample of 1003 randomly selected U.S

Stats Modeling the World | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780321854018 | Authors: David E. Bock, Paul F. Velleman, Richard D. De Veaux ISBN: 9780321854018 481

Solution for problem 39 Chapter 21

Stats Modeling the World | 4th Edition

  • Textbook Solutions
  • 2901 Step-by-step solutions solved by professors and subject experts
  • Get 24/7 help from StudySoup virtual teaching assistants
Stats Modeling the World | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780321854018 | Authors: David E. Bock, Paul F. Velleman, Richard D. De Veaux

Stats Modeling the World | 4th Edition

4 5 1 424 Reviews
26
2
Problem 39

NIMBY. In March 2007, the Gallup Poll split a sample of 1003 randomly selected U.S. adults into two groups at random. Half 1n = 5022 of the respondents were asked, Overall, do you strongly favor, somewhat favor, somewhat oppose, or strongly oppose the use of nuclear energy as one of the ways to provide electricity for the U.S.? They found that 53% were either somewhat or strongly in favor. The other half 1n = 5012 were asked, Overall, would you strongly favor, somewhat favor, somewhat oppose, or strongly oppose the construction of a nuclear energy plant in your area as one of the ways to provide electricity for the U.S.? Only 40% were somewhat or strongly in favor. This difference is an example of the NIMBY (Not In My BackYard) phenomenon and is a serious concern to policy makers and planners. How large is the difference between the proportion of American adults who think nuclear energy is a good idea and the proportion who would be willing to have a nuclear plant in their area? Construct and interpret an appropriate confidence interval.

Step-by-Step Solution:
Step 1 of 3

STAT 110: Notes for Week of 9/13/16  Chapter 10 o In order to describe data, you must figure out if it is quantitative or categorical. o Quantitative Variable: a variable that measures something already in numerical form, ex. inches of a piece of paper, weight of a person, IQ, etc. o Categorical Variable: measures something that needs to be put into categories and/or given numerical value, ex. favorite color, ethnicity, current feelings, etc. o Distribution of a variable: tells what values of a variable occur and how often they occur, ex. 20 people like the color blue, 0 people like the color orange, etc.  Distributions can be described through tables, graphs, or num

Step 2 of 3

Chapter 21, Problem 39 is Solved
Step 3 of 3

Textbook: Stats Modeling the World
Edition: 4
Author: David E. Bock, Paul F. Velleman, Richard D. De Veaux
ISBN: 9780321854018

Other solutions

People also purchased

Related chapters

Unlock Textbook Solution

Enter your email below to unlock your verified solution to:

NIMBY. In March 2007, the Gallup Poll split a sample of 1003 randomly selected U.S