×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Organic Chemistry - 7 Edition - Chapter 14 - Problem 14.7
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Organic Chemistry - 7 Edition - Chapter 14 - Problem 14.7

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

The so-called nitrogen rule states that if a compound has an odd number of

Organic Chemistry | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9781133952848 | Authors: William H. Brown, Brent L. Iverson, Eric Anslyn, Christopher S. Foote ISBN: 9781133952848 483

Solution for problem 14.7 Chapter 14

Organic Chemistry | 7th Edition

  • Textbook Solutions
  • 2901 Step-by-step solutions solved by professors and subject experts
  • Get 24/7 help from StudySoup virtual teaching assistants
Organic Chemistry | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9781133952848 | Authors: William H. Brown, Brent L. Iverson, Eric Anslyn, Christopher S. Foote

Organic Chemistry | 7th Edition

4 5 1 272 Reviews
17
2
Problem 14.7

The so-called nitrogen rule states that if a compound has an odd number of nitrogenatoms, the value of m/z for its molecular ion will be an odd number. Why?

Step-by-Step Solution:
Step 1 of 3

Chapter 1 Key Terms and Definitions Building Blocks: – Atoms and Molecules Definition of Chemistry: –Science that seeks to understand the properties of matter by studying the particles that compose it. Mixture: – No fixed composition – Homogeneous Mixture  Solution; Same throughout –Heterogeneous Mixture  Varies in composition or properties. Substance: – Fixed composition – Elements or Compound History and Starting Point Law of Conservation of Mass (Lavoisier) • The total mass remains constant during a chemical reaction. Law of Definite Proportions (Proust) • All samples of a compound have the same composition (proportions, by mass, of the elements present). Atomic Theory of Matter (Dalton) Law of Multiple Proportions • The masses of one element that combine with a fixed mass of the second element are in the ratio of small whole numbers. Experiment: N reacts with O to form two compounds. If 5.0 g of N is used, then one compound takes 5.7 g of O and the other 11.4 g. Ratio is 2:1. • All matter is composed of atoms: extremely small, indivisible particles. • All atoms of a given element are alike in mass and other properties, but differ from atoms of other elements. • Compounds a

Step 2 of 3

Chapter 14, Problem 14.7 is Solved
Step 3 of 3

Textbook: Organic Chemistry
Edition: 7
Author: William H. Brown, Brent L. Iverson, Eric Anslyn, Christopher S. Foote
ISBN: 9781133952848

Other solutions

People also purchased

Related chapters

Unlock Textbook Solution

Enter your email below to unlock your verified solution to:

The so-called nitrogen rule states that if a compound has an odd number of