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Consistent Notation If we use the binomial probability

Elementary Statistics | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321836960 | Authors: Mario F. Triola ISBN: 9780321836960 18

Solution for problem 2BSC Chapter 5.3

Elementary Statistics | 12th Edition

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Elementary Statistics | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321836960 | Authors: Mario F. Triola

Elementary Statistics | 12th Edition

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Problem 2BSC

Problem  2BSC

 

Consistent Notation If we use the binomial probability formula (Formula 5-5) for finding the probability described in Exercise 1, what is wrong with letting p denote the probability of getting an adult who includes Wal-Mart while x counts the number of adults who do not include Wal-Mart?

Exercise 1

Calculating Probabilities Based on a Saint Index survey, assume that when adults are asked to identify the most unpopular projects for their hometown, 54% include Wal-Mart among their choices. Suppose we want to find the probability that when five adults are randomly selected, exactly two of them include Wal-Mart. What is wrong with using the multiplication rule to find the probability of getting two adults who include Wal-Mart followed by three people who do not include Wal-Mart, as in this calculation: (0.54)(0.54)(0.46)(0.46)(0.46)?

Step-by-Step Solution:
Step 1 of 3

Solution  2BSC

 Since P= probability of success in any one trial and x= number of successes among n trials, if we take p, the probability of getting an adult who includes...

Step 2 of 3

Chapter 5.3, Problem 2BSC is Solved
Step 3 of 3

Textbook: Elementary Statistics
Edition: 12
Author: Mario F. Triola
ISBN: 9780321836960

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Consistent Notation If we use the binomial probability

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