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You are high up in the mountains and boil water to make some tea. However, when you drink your tea, it is not as hot as it should be. You try again and

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition | ISBN: 9780134414232 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus ISBN: 9780134414232 1274

Solution for problem 11.54 Chapter 11

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition

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Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition | ISBN: 9780134414232 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition

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Problem 11.54 You are high up in the mountains and boil water to make some tea. However, when you drink your tea, it is not as hot as it should be. You try again and again, but the water is just not hot enough to make a hot cup of tea. Which is the best explanation for this result?


(a) High in the mountains, it is probably very dry, and so the water is rapidly evaporating from your cup and cooling it.


(b) High in the mountains, it is probably very windy, and so the water is rapidly evaporating from your cup and cooling it.


(c) High in the mountains, the air pressure is significantly less than 1 atm, so the boiling point of water is much lower than at sea level.


(d) High in the mountains, the air pressure is significantly less than 1 atm, so the boiling point of water is much higher than at sea level.
Step-by-Step Solution:

Step 1 of 5) Thus, the rate of the overall reaction depends on the rate of step 1, and the rate law of the overall reaction equals the rate law of step 1. Step 1 is a bimolecular process that has the rate law Thus, the rate law predicted by this mechanism agrees with the one observed experimentally. The reactant CO is absent from the rate law because it reacts in a step that follows the rate-determining step. A scientist would not, at this point, say that we have “proved” that this mechanism is correct. All we can say is that the rate law predicted by the mechanism is consistent with experiment. We can often envision a different sequence of steps that leads to the same rate law. If, however, the predicted rate law of the proposed mechanism disagrees with the experiment, we know for certain that the mechanism cannot be correct.

Step 2 of 2

Chapter 11, Problem 11.54 is Solved
Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 14
Author: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus
ISBN: 9780134414232

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You are high up in the mountains and boil water to make some tea. However, when you drink your tea, it is not as hot as it should be. You try again and