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University Physics, Volume 3 | 17th Edition | ISBN: 9781938168185 | Authors: Samuel J. Ling ISBN: 9781938168185 2032

Solution for problem 33 Chapter 10

University Physics, Volume 3 | 17th Edition

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University Physics, Volume 3 | 17th Edition | ISBN: 9781938168185 | Authors: Samuel J. Ling

University Physics, Volume 3 | 17th Edition

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Problem 33

Radioactive Decay

A sample of radioactive material is obtained from a very old rock. A plot In A verses t yields a

slope value of \(-10^{-9} s^{-1}\) (see Figure 10.10(b). What is the half-life of this material?

Text Transcription:

-10^-9 s^-1

Step-by-Step Solution:
Step 1 of 3

Electrostatics: Chapters 21­22 Tuesday, September 9, 2014 2:44 PM Some things to explain in detail: A test charge is one that is small enough so that the charge configuration you are looking for is not disturbed. If you were to bring a 1μC charge up against some giant 1C charge, the smaller "test" charge would not really affect the position of the charge configuration you're studying. This leaves the equations dipole mentioned fairly easy to deal with. If, on the other hand, you put two 1C charges in proximity (or any charge of similar magnitude), the charge configuration will feel a strong enough force from the "test" charge that it will begin to move. If your charges move, your positions are no longer time­independent and the system becomes far more challenging to analyze. From A point charge, however, is a charged entity which occupies a single minute point (ideal conditions) in space. For practical purposes we can consider any tiny charged body as a point charge, an object where all the charge is concentrated at one single point. Using point charges in basic derivations of electrostatic equations such as Coulomb's and Gauss's law eliminates the complexities of distribution and concentration of charge over the charged body. The Beginning Benjamin Franklin was the first to realize the

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Chapter 10, Problem 33 is Solved
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Textbook: University Physics, Volume 3
Edition: 17
Author: Samuel J. Ling
ISBN: 9781938168185

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