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?How many nonbonding electron pairs are there in each of the following molecules: (a) \(\left(\mathrm{CH}_{3}\right)_{2} \mathrm{~S}\),

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition | ISBN: 9780134414232 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus ISBN: 9780134414232 1274

Solution for problem 9.21 Chapter 9

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition

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Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition | ISBN: 9780134414232 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition

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Problem 9.21

How many nonbonding electron pairs are there in each of the following molecules:

(a) \(\left(\mathrm{CH}_{3}\right)_{2} \mathrm{~S}\),

(b) HCN

(c) \(\mathrm{C}_{2} \mathrm{H}_{2}\),

(d) \mathrm{CH}_{3} \mathrm{~F}\)?

Text Transcription:

(CH_3)_2S

C_2H_2

CH_3F

Step-by-Step Solution:

Step 1 of 5) Molecule (i) is not likely to be liquid crystalline because the absence of double and/or triple bonds makes this molecule flexible rather than rigid. Molecule (iii) is ionic, and the generally high melting points of ionic materials make it unlikely that this substance is liquid crystalline. Molecule (ii) possesses the characteristic long axis and the kinds of structural features often seen in liquid crystals: The molecule has a rod-like shape, the double bonds and benzene rings provide rigidity, and the polar COOCH3 group creates a dipole moment. Substances that are gases or liquids at room temperature are usually composed of molecules. In gases, the intermolecular attractive forces are negligible compared to the kinetic energies of the molecules; thus, the molecules are widely separated and undergo constant, chaotic motion. In liquids, the intermolecular forces are strong enough to keep the molecules in close proximity; nevertheless, the molecules are free to move with respect to one another. In solids, the intermolecular attractive forces are strong enough to restrain molecular motion and to force the particles to occupy specific locations in a three-dimensional arrangement.

Step 2 of 2

Chapter 9, Problem 9.21 is Solved
Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 14
Author: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus
ISBN: 9780134414232

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?How many nonbonding electron pairs are there in each of the following molecules: (a) \(\left(\mathrm{CH}_{3}\right)_{2} \mathrm{~S}\),