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?You have a sample of gas in a container with a movable piston, such as the one in the drawing. (a) Redraw the container to show what it migh

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition | ISBN: 9780134414232 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus ISBN: 9780134414232 1274

Solution for problem 10.2 Chapter 10

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition

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Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition | ISBN: 9780134414232 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition

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Problem 10.2

You have a sample of gas in a container with a movable piston, such as the one in the drawing.

(a) Redraw the container to show what it might look like if the temperature of the gas is increased from 300 to 500 K while the pressure is kept constant.

(b) Redraw the container to show what it might look like if the external pressure on the piston is increased from 1.0 atm to 2.0 atm while the temperature is kept constant.

(c) Redraw the container to show what it might look like if the temperature of the gas decreases from 300 to 200 K while the pressure is kept constant (assume the gas does not liquefy). [Section 10.3]

Step-by-Step Solution:

Step 1 of 5) Metals also have unusual properties on the 1–100-nm-length scale. Fundamentally, this is because the mean free path (Section 10.8) of an electron in a metal at room temperature is typically about 1–100 nm. So when the particle size of a metal is 100 nm or less, one might expect unusual effects because the “sea of electrons” encounters a “shore” (the surface of the particle). The interior surfaces attract ions and molecules that weakly interact with the rigid framework of aluminum, silicon, and oxygen atoms. Various pore and cavity sizes can be prepared by varying the chemical composition and synthesis method. Zeolites may be synthesized with weakly interacting ions occupying the cavities. Upon exposure to ions that interact more strongly with the interior surfaces, there is a preferential exchange of weakly interacting ions for more strongly interacting ions.This effectively creates what we might think of as an ionic sponge. An example that illustrates this behavior is the use of a sodium zeolite to remove radioactive cesium (134Cs and 137Cs) from contaminated areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants in Japan, which were damaged by an earthquake and tsunami in 2011.

Step 2 of 2

Chapter 10, Problem 10.2 is Solved
Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 14
Author: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus
ISBN: 9780134414232

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?You have a sample of gas in a container with a movable piston, such as the one in the drawing. (a) Redraw the container to show what it migh