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Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition | ISBN: 9780134414232 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus ISBN: 9780134414232 1274

Solution for problem 12.25 Chapter 12

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition

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Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition | ISBN: 9780134414232 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition

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Problem 12.25

Which of the three-dimensional primitive lattices has a unit cell where none of the internal angles is \(90^{\circ}\)?

(a) Orthorhombic,

(b) hexagonal,

(c) rhombohedral,

(d) triclinic,

(e) both rhombohedral and triclinic.

Text Transcription:

90^{\circ}

Step-by-Step Solution:

Step 1 of 5) An acid and a base such as HA and A- that differ only in the presence or absence of a proton are called a conjugate acid–base pair. Every acid has a conjugate base, formed by removing a proton from the acid. For example, OH- is the conjugate base of H2O, and A- is the conjugate base of HA. Every base has a conjugate acid, formed by adding a proton to the base. Thus, H3O+ is the conjugate acid of H2O, and HA is the conjugate acid of A- . In any acid–base (proton-transfer) reaction, we can identify two sets of conjugate acid–base pairs. For example, consider the reaction between nitrous acid and water:We are asked to give the conjugate base for several acids and the conjugate acid for several bases. The conjugate base of a substance is simply the parent substance minus one proton, and the conjugate acid of a substance is the parent substance plus one proton.Once you become proficient at identifying conjugate acid–base pairs it is not difficult to write equations for reactions involving Brønsted–Lowry acids and bases (proton-transfer reactions).

Step 2 of 2

Chapter 12, Problem 12.25 is Solved
Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 14
Author: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus
ISBN: 9780134414232

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