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?The unit cell of a compound containing potassium, aluminum, and fluorine is shown here. (a) What type of lattice does this crystal possess (

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition | ISBN: 9780134414232 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus ISBN: 9780134414232 1274

Solution for problem 12.30 Chapter 12

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition

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Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition | ISBN: 9780134414232 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition

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Problem 12.30

The unit cell of a compound containing potassium, aluminum, and fluorine is shown here.

(a) What type of lattice does this crystal possess (all three lattice vectors are mutually perpendicular)?

(b) What is the empirical formula?

Step-by-Step Solution:

Step 1 of 5) We are asked to predict whether an equilibrium lies to the right, favoring products, or to the left, favoring reactants. Plan This is a proton-transfer reaction, and the position of the equilibrium will favor the proton going to the stronger of two bases. The two bases in the equation are CO3 2 - , the base in the forward reaction, and SO4 2 - , the conjugate base of HSO4 - . We can find the relative positions of these two bases in Figure 16.4 to determine which is the stronger base. One of the most important chemical properties of water is its ability to act as either a Brønsted–Lowry acid or a Brønsted–Lowry base. In the presence of an acid, it acts as a proton acceptor; in the presence of a base, it acts as a proton donor. In fact, one water molecule can donate a proton to another water molecule:We call this process the autoionization of water. Because the forward and reverse reactions in Equation 16.12 are extremely rapid, no water molecule remains ionized for long. At room temperature only about two out of every 109 water molecules are ionized at any given instant. Thus, pure water consists almost entirely of H2O molecules and is an extremely poor conductor of electricity. Nevertheless, the automation of water is very important, as we will soon learn.

Step 2 of 2

Chapter 12, Problem 12.30 is Solved
Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 14
Author: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus
ISBN: 9780134414232

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?The unit cell of a compound containing potassium, aluminum, and fluorine is shown here. (a) What type of lattice does this crystal possess (