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?The _______ variable is the variable whose value can be explained by the value of the explanatory variable.

Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780134133539 | Authors: Michael Sullivan III ISBN: 9780134133539 240

Solution for problem 2 Chapter 4.1

Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data | 5th Edition

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Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780134133539 | Authors: Michael Sullivan III

Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data | 5th Edition

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Problem 2

The _______ variable is the variable whose value can be explained by the value of the explanatory variable.

Step-by-Step Solution:

Step 1 of 5) The variable is the variable whose value can be explained by the value of the explanatory variable. For example, using Example 1, we could create a bar graph that lists the proportion of patients requiring back, shoulder, or knee rehabilitation, but it would not make sense to construct a pie chart for this situation. Do you see why Only 70% of the data would be represented. When should a bar graph or a pie chart be used Pie charts are useful for showing the division of all possible values of a qualitative variable into its parts. However, because angles are often hard to judge in pie charts, they are not as useful in comparing two specific values of the qualitative variable. Instead, the emphasis is on comparing the part to the whole. Bar graphs are useful when we want to compare the different parts, not necessarily the parts to the whole. For example, to get the “big picture” regarding educational attainment in 2013, a pie chart is a good visual summary. However, to compare bachelor’s degrees to high school diplomas, a bar graph is a better visual summary. Since bars are easier to draw and compare, some practitioners forgo pie charts in favor of Pareto charts when comparing parts to the whole

Step 2 of 2

Chapter 4.1, Problem 2 is Solved
Textbook: Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data
Edition: 5
Author: Michael Sullivan III
ISBN: 9780134133539

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?The _______ variable is the variable whose value can be explained by the value of the explanatory variable.