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?In Problems 9–12, determine whether the scatter diagram indicates that a linear relation may exist between the two variables. If the relation is linea

Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780134133539 | Authors: Michael Sullivan III ISBN: 9780134133539 240

Solution for problem 10 Chapter 4.1

Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data | 5th Edition

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Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780134133539 | Authors: Michael Sullivan III

Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data | 5th Edition

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Problem 10

In Problems 9–12, determine whether the scatter diagram indicates that a linear relation may exist between the two variables. If the relation is linear, determine whether it indicates a positive or negative association between the variables.

Step-by-Step Solution:

Step 1 of 5) In Problems 9–12, determine whether the scatter diagram indicates that a linear relationship may exist between the two variables. If the relation is linear, determine whether it indicates a positive or negative association between the variables. Generally, there should be between 5 and 20 classes. The smaller the data set, the fewer classes you should have. For example, we might choose 12 classes for the data in Table 12. r Determine the class width by computing Class width ≈ largest data value - smallest data value number of classes Round this value up to a convenient number. For example, using the data in Table 12, we obtain class width ≈ 19.43 - 8.28 12 = 0.929. We round this up to 1 because this is an easy number to work with. Rounding up may result in fewer classes than were originally intended.

Step 2 of 2

Chapter 4.1, Problem 10 is Solved
Textbook: Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data
Edition: 5
Author: Michael Sullivan III
ISBN: 9780134133539

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?In Problems 9–12, determine whether the scatter diagram indicates that a linear relation may exist between the two variables. If the relation is linea