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Is the use of significant figures in each of the following statements appropriate? (a) The 2005 circulation of National Geographic was 7,812,564.

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition | ISBN: 9780134414232 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus ISBN: 9780134414232 1274

Solution for problem 1.70 Chapter 1

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition

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Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition | ISBN: 9780134414232 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition

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Problem 1.70 Is the use of significant figures in each of the following statements appropriate? (a) The 2005 circulation of National Geographic was 7,812,564. (b) On July 1, 2005, the population of Cook County, Illinois, was 5,303,683. (c) In the United States, 0.621% of the population has the surname Brown. (d) You calculate your grade point average to be 3.87562.
Step-by-Step Solution:

Step 1 of 5) For multiplication and division, the result contains the same number of significant figures as the measurement with the fewest significant figures. When the result contains more than the correct number of significant figures, it must be rounded off. For example, the area of a rectangle whose measured edge lengths are 6.221 and 5.2 cm should be reported with two significant figures, 32 cm2, even though a calculator shows the product to have more digits:In determining the final answer for a calculated quantity, exact numbers are assumed to have an infinite number of significant figures. Thus, when we say, “There are 12 inches in 1 foot,” the number 12 is exact, and we need not worry about the number of significant figures in it.The mass of a glass beaker is known to be 25.1 g. Approximately 5 mL of water are added, and the mass of the beaker and water is measured on an analytical balance to be 30.625 g. How many significant figures are there in the mass of the water

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Chapter 1, Problem 1.70 is Solved
Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 14
Author: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus
ISBN: 9780134414232

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Is the use of significant figures in each of the following statements appropriate? (a) The 2005 circulation of National Geographic was 7,812,564.