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Write the condensed electron configurations for the following atoms, using the appropriate noble-gas core abbreviations: (a) Cs, (b) Ni, (c) S

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition | ISBN: 9780134414232 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus ISBN: 9780134414232 1274

Solution for problem 6.75 Chapter 6

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition

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Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition | ISBN: 9780134414232 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition

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Problem 6.75 Write the condensed electron configurations for the following atoms, using the appropriate noble-gas core abbreviations: (a) Cs, (b) Ni, (c) Se, (d) Cd, (e) U, (f) Pb.
Step-by-Step Solution:

Step 1 of 5) Write the condensed electron configurations for the following atoms, using the appropriate noble-gas core abbreviations: In this chapter, we have focused on the interactions that lead to the formation of chemical bonds. We classify these bonds into three broad groups: ionic bonds, which result from the electrostatic forces that exist between ions of opposite charge; covalent bonds, which result from the sharing of electrons by two atoms; and metallic bonds, which result from a delocalized sharing of electrons in metals. The formation of bonds involves interactions of the outermost electrons of atoms, their valence electrons. The valence electrons of an atom can be represented by electron-dot symbols, called Lewis symbols. The tendencies of atoms to gain, lose, or share their valence electrons often follow the octet rule, which says that the atoms in molecules or ions (usually) have eight valence electrons.

Step 2 of 2

Chapter 6, Problem 6.75 is Solved
Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 14
Author: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus
ISBN: 9780134414232

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Write the condensed electron configurations for the following atoms, using the appropriate noble-gas core abbreviations: (a) Cs, (b) Ni, (c) S