×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Chemistry: The Central Science - 14 Edition - Chapter 7 - Problem 7.53
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Chemistry: The Central Science - 14 Edition - Chapter 7 - Problem 7.53

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

Consider the first ionization energy of neon and the electron affinity of fluorine. (a) Write equations, including electron configurations, for each

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition | ISBN: 9780134414232 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus ISBN: 9780134414232 1274

Solution for problem 7.53 Chapter 7

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition

  • Textbook Solutions
  • 2901 Step-by-step solutions solved by professors and subject experts
  • Get 24/7 help from StudySoup virtual teaching assistants
Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition | ISBN: 9780134414232 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition

4 5 1 267 Reviews
24
0
Problem 7.53 Consider the first ionization energy of neon and the electron affinity of fluorine. (a) Write equations, including electron configurations, for each process. (b) These two quantities have opposite signs. Which will be positive, and which will be negative? (c) Would you expect the magnitudes of these two quantities to be equal? If not, which one would you expect to be larger?
Step-by-Step Solution:

Step 1 of 5) In almost all cases, single bonds are s bonds. A double bond consists of one s bond and one p bond, and a triple bond consists of one s bond and two p bonds: Consider ethylene 1C2H42, which has a C“C double bond. As illustrated by the balland-stick model of Figure 9.21, the three bond angles about each carbon are all approximately 120°, suggesting that each carbon atom uses sp2 hybrid orbitals (Figure 9.16) to form s bonds with the other carbon and with two hydrogens. Because carbon has four valence electrons, after sp2 hybridization one electron in each carbon remains in the unhybridized 2p orbital. Note that this unhybridized 2p orbital is directed perpendicular to the plane that contains the three sp2 hybrid orbitals. Let’s go through the steps of building the bonds in the ethylene molecule. Each sp2 hybrid orbital on a carbon atom contains one electron. Figure 9.22 shows how we can first envision forming the C¬C s bond by the overlap of two sp2 hybrid orbitals, one on each carbon atom. Two electrons are used in forming the C¬C s bond. Next, the C¬H s bonds are formed by overlap of the remaining sp2 hybrid orbitals on the C atoms with the 1s orbitals on each H atom. We use eight more electrons to form these four C¬H bonds. Thus, 10 of the 12 valence electrons in the C2H4 molecule are used to form five s bonds.

Step 2 of 2

Chapter 7, Problem 7.53 is Solved
Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 14
Author: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus
ISBN: 9780134414232

Other solutions

Discover and learn what students are asking








Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data : Applications of the Normal Distribution
?If X is a normal random variable with mean 40 and standard deviation 10 and P(X > 45) = 0.3085, then P(X < 35) = _______ .


Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data : Inference on the Least-Squares Regression Model and Multiple Regression
?A researcher believes that as age increases, the grip strength (pounds per square inch, psi) of an individual’s dominant hand decreases. From a random

Chemistry: The Central Science : Chemical Reactions and Reaction Stoichiometry
?A compound whose empirical formula is \(\mathrm{XF}_{3}\) consists of 65 % F by mass. What is the atomic mass of X ?


People also purchased

Related chapters

Unlock Textbook Solution

Enter your email below to unlock your verified solution to:

Consider the first ionization energy of neon and the electron affinity of fluorine. (a) Write equations, including electron configurations, for each