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?Identify the carbon atom(s) in the structure shown that has (have) each of the following hybridizations: (a) s p^{3}, (b) sp,

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition | ISBN: 9780134414232 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus ISBN: 9780134414232 1274

Solution for problem 24.1 Chapter 24

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition

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Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition | ISBN: 9780134414232 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition

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Problem 24.1

Identify the carbon atom(s) in the structure shown that has (have) each of the following hybridizations:

(a) s p^{3},

(b) sp,

(c) s p^{2}.

Text Transcription:

s p^{3}

s p^{2}

Step-by-Step Solution:

Step 1 of 5) Notice that each succeeding compound in Table 24.2 has an additional CH2 unit. The formulas for the alkanes given in Table 24.2 are written in a notation called condensed structural formulas. This notation reveals the way in which atoms are bonded to one another but does not require drawing in all the bonds. For example, the structural formula and the condensed structural formulas for butane.Bonds about carbon in methane. This tetrahedral molecular geometry is found around all carbons in alkanes.is tetrahedral. (Section 9.2) The bonding may be described as involving sp3@hybridized orbitals on the carbon, as pictured in Figure 24.3 for methane. (Section 9.5) Rotation about a carbon–carbon single bond is relatively easy and occurs rapidly at room temperature. To visualize such rotation, imagine grasping either methyl group of the propane molecule in Figure 24.4 and rotating the group relative to the rest of the molecule. Because motion of this sort occurs rapidly in alkanes, a long-chain alkane molecule is constantly undergoing motions that cause it to change its overall shape.

Step 2 of 2

Chapter 24, Problem 24.1 is Solved
Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 14
Author: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus
ISBN: 9780134414232

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?Identify the carbon atom(s) in the structure shown that has (have) each of the following hybridizations: (a) s p^{3}, (b) sp,