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Fundamentals of General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry (Mastering Chemistry) | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780134015187 | Authors: John McMurry, David Ballantine, Carl Hoeger, Virginia Peterson ISBN: 9780134015187 2044

Solution for problem 14.11 Chapter 14.4

Fundamentals of General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry (Mastering Chemistry) | 8th Edition

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Fundamentals of General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry (Mastering Chemistry) | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780134015187 | Authors: John McMurry, David Ballantine, Carl Hoeger, Virginia Peterson

Fundamentals of General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry (Mastering Chemistry) | 8th Edition

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Problem 14.11

What products would you expect from oxidation of the following alcohols?

(a) \(\mathrm{CH}_{3} \mathrm{CH}_{2} \mathrm{CH}_{2} \mathrm{OH}\)

Text Transcription:

CH_3CH_2CH_2OH

Step-by-Step Solution:
Step 1 of 3

Tuesday, Feb 23 “I” – subjective impulse “Me” – object of my own reflection; generalized other. Mead: we develop this over patterns of time 1. Imitation – picking up meanings of symbol sets. We aren’t human until we learn to communicate. 2. Play Stage/Role Model – copying significant others (primary group of socialization)  empathy  reciprocity. Learning how to take on roles of others to better understand ourselves; take yourself out of your shoes to evaluate yourself; becomes more complex as we learn language; enables us to see ourselves subjectively and objectively 3. Game Play – each person has a set of expectations for the collective team; we learn role sets and expectations for everyone else. We hold each other accountable; complex systems emerge from our interactions, which gives us insight into the generalized other, checking me for accountability towards behavior centered around overarching expectations; we need to pay attention to self; our self is the sum total of all our interactions with others. Our consistent self is just us supporting ideas of our self through positive feedback. Self-concept 1. Imagining how we appear to others 2. Imagining how others judge us (generalized other; objective sense of self) (heavily influenced by culture) 3. Some feeling  behavior Status: a position assigned by society Master status: defining characteristic of who you are to others; we may hide these things out of fear of stigma Statuses that define us and expectations of behavior World is constantly constructed by expectations Cooley & Mead There can be no individual outside of the social sphere. We are copying patterns repeatedly out of fear of being sanctioned or ostracized. Anything we call personality is an outgrowth of social life, performance, and expectations Expectations of others is crucial to what drives us We become uniquely human by learning to communicate and interacting with others There is no individual in isolation; you are a product of every person you have met. Status vs. Role = Social location vs expectation of behavior in status Socialization teaches you roles and expectations. Ex. Student and professor. W. I. Thomas Q. what is determining our expectations A. situations; we have got to define them. As soon as we enter any situation, we immediately evaluate and compare relevant experiences. We step into situations and define them. If men define things as real, their consequences will be. Thursday, Feb 25 Looking Glass Self – Cooley We are products of our interactions with others. We reflect on how we think others will judge us and alter our behavior accordingly. Self is different than identity. Self is an outgrowth of social interaction; reflexive – constantly changing to meet expectations of others. Identity is a social characteristic; convincing others who you are. The black box: psychological conditions Sociology: society self Consistency is created through interactions and expectations. When you look at yourself, you are making yourself an object of your own reflection, from the perspective of others. Dramaturgy Theoretical metaphor for how you perform and behave in certain contexts. Our performance is the best information people have about us. See things as a performance rather than social interactions and patterns. Scripts define the expectations of the situation. Your character is self. Socialization Imitation, Play, and Game is early socialization. Adults go beyond this but not until they have mastered these three. Socialization is the process of understanding cultures and how to achieve desire outcomes among many people of different types Framing – Goffman Creating illusions of conflict and issues where there are none; real consequences though. Assumption: process of emergence We are not top down processing. We aren’t victims of expectations, we are creators of them. We can’t treat the world as if it is fixed; change is constantly occurring.

Step 2 of 3

Chapter 14.4, Problem 14.11 is Solved
Step 3 of 3

Textbook: Fundamentals of General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry (Mastering Chemistry)
Edition: 8
Author: John McMurry, David Ballantine, Carl Hoeger, Virginia Peterson
ISBN: 9780134015187

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