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How many correct experiments do we need to disprove a

University Physics | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321675460 | Authors: Hugh D. Young, Roger A. Freedman ISBN: 9780321675460 31

Solution for problem 1DQ Chapter 1

University Physics | 13th Edition

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University Physics | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321675460 | Authors: Hugh D. Young, Roger A. Freedman

University Physics | 13th Edition

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Problem 1DQ

How many correct experiments do we need to disprove a theory? How many do we need to prove a theory? Explain.

Step-by-Step Solution:

Solution 1DQ Step 1 To disprove a theory, one good experiment with strong and solid explanations is enough. While we are formulating a theory regarding a particular phenomenon or observation, it should be applicable for every feature related to that. If it is not, we cannot consider it as a theory. So, one strong experimental evidence is enough to disprove a theory. Example: Existence of the concept of ether. The concept of ether was proposed by Aristotle in earlier times. According to him, light is travelling through a medium called ether. After the development of Modern Physics, this concept of ether was rejected by the evidence which we have got from the Michelson-Morley experiment.

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Chapter 1, Problem 1DQ is Solved
Textbook: University Physics
Edition: 13
Author: Hugh D. Young, Roger A. Freedman
ISBN: 9780321675460

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