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A uniform marble rolls without slipping down the path

University Physics | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321675460 | Authors: Hugh D. Young, Roger A. Freedman ISBN: 9780321675460 31

Solution for problem 80P Chapter 10

University Physics | 13th Edition

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University Physics | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321675460 | Authors: Hugh D. Young, Roger A. Freedman

University Physics | 13th Edition

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Problem 80P

A uniform marble rolls without slipping down the path shown in Figure, starting from rest. (a) Find the minimum height ?h? required for the marble not to fall into the pit. (b) The moment of inertia of the Figure marble depends on its radius. Explain why the answer to part (a) does not depend on the radius of the marble. (c) Solve part (a) for a block that slides without friction instead of the rolling marble. How does the minimum ?h? in this case compare to the answer in part (a)? Figure:

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PHYS 1010 Notes Week 14 ­ April 18­22 ­ Heisenberg uncertainty principle: the more we know about the position of a particle, the less we know about its momentum (and vice versa) ­ Before we measure a particle, it doesn't have a position, just a probability of a position; by measuring it, we force it to choose properties ­ Tunneling ­ Particles can pass through walls ­ Energy­time uncertainty ­ Photons borrow energy from the universe and turn into an electron or a positron ­ They can only borrow the energy temporarily ­ Positron = an electron moving backward in time ­ Anti­matter is matter moving backward in time ­ In­distinguishability: we can't tell two electrons apart ­ EPR Paradox: a photon turns into an electron and a positron (energy ­­> mass) one goes to the right and one goes to the left; both have an equal chance of being a positron or an electron, but we don't know which, because we haven't measured them ­ Even though these particles are far away, measuring one immediately describes the properties of the other ­ Strange connection between particles ­ If this is true, information travels faster than the speed of light ­ Quantum­Xeno Paradox ­ Unstable situation like balancing a ball on a sharp point ­ Describing the situation as a factor of time and probability ­ Beginning of time ­ 100% ­ As time goes on, probability goes down ­ Not watching it for a brief amount of time measures it ­­> probability goes away/starts over ­ By continually watching it, it is a stable situation ­ Hidden variables interpretation: there must be more information that we don't know ­ Copenhagen interpretation: assuming that measuring something collapses a wave function is problematic for some reason we don't know ­ Many worlds interpretation: measuring something makes it choose both possibilities, which creates an infinite number of universes PHYS 1010 Notes Week 14 ­ April 18­22 ­ Heisenberg uncertainty principle: the more we know about the position of a particle, the less we know about its momentum (and vice versa) ­ Before we measure a particle, it doesn't have a position, just a probability of a position; by measuring it, we force it to choose properties ­ Tunneling ­ Particles can pass through walls ­ Energy­time uncertainty ­ Photons borrow energy from the universe and turn into an electron or a positron ­ They can only borrow the energy temporarily ­ Positron = an electron moving backward in time ­ Anti­matter is matter moving backward in time ­ In­distinguishability: we can't tell two electrons apart ­ EPR Paradox: a photon turns into an electron and a positron (energy ­­> mass) one goes to the right and one goes to the left; both have an equal chance of being a positron or an electron, but we don't know which, because we haven't measured them ­ Even though these particles are far away, measuring one immediately describes the properties of the other ­ Strange connection between particles ­ If this is true, information travels faster than the speed of light ­ Quantum­Xeno Paradox ­ Unstable situation like balancing a ball on a sharp point ­ Describing the situation as a factor of time and probability ­ Beginning of time ­ 100% ­ As time goes on, probability goes down ­ Not watching it for a brief amount of time measures it ­­> probability goes away/starts over ­ By continually watching it, it is a stable situation ­ Hidden variables interpretation: there must be more information that we don't know ­ Copenhagen interpretation: assuming that measuring something collapses a wave function is problematic for some reason we don't know ­ Many worlds interpretation: measuring something makes it choose both possibilities, which creates an infinite number of universes

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Chapter 10, Problem 80P is Solved
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Textbook: University Physics
Edition: 13
Author: Hugh D. Young, Roger A. Freedman
ISBN: 9780321675460

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A uniform marble rolls without slipping down the path