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Solved: Which statements are consistent with Dalton's

Introductory Chemistry | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910295 | Authors: Nivaldo J Tro ISBN: 9780321910295 34

Solution for problem 28P Chapter 4

Introductory Chemistry | 5th Edition

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Introductory Chemistry | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910295 | Authors: Nivaldo J Tro

Introductory Chemistry | 5th Edition

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Problem 28P

Which statements are consistent with Dalton's atomic theory as it was originally stated? Explain your answers.

(a) Calcium and titanium atoms have the same mass.

(b) Neon and argon atoms are the same.

(c) All cobalt atoms are identical.

(d) Sodium and chlorine atoms combine in a 1:1 ratio to form sodium chloride.

Step-by-Step Solution:

Solution  28P

Here, we are going to find which of the given statements are consistent with Dalton’s atomic theory.

Step 1:

According to Dalton’s atomic theory, all matter, whether an element, a compound or a mixture is composed of small particles called atoms. The postulates of this theory may be stated as follows:

All matter is made of very tiny particles called atoms.Atoms are indivisible particles, which cannot be created or destroyed in a chemical reaction. Atoms of a given element are identical in mass and chemical properties.Atoms of different elements have different masses and chemical properties. Atoms combine in the ratio of small whole numbers to form compounds.The relative number and kinds of atoms are constant in a given compound.

Step 2 of 2

Chapter 4, Problem 28P is Solved
Textbook: Introductory Chemistry
Edition: 5
Author: Nivaldo J Tro
ISBN: 9780321910295

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Solved: Which statements are consistent with Dalton's

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