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Solved: Explain the difference between a Bohr orbit and a quantum-mechanical orbital

Introductory Chemistry | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910295 | Authors: Nivaldo J Tro ISBN: 9780321910295 34

Solution for problem 15Q Chapter 9

Introductory Chemistry | 5th Edition

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Introductory Chemistry | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910295 | Authors: Nivaldo J Tro

Introductory Chemistry | 5th Edition

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Problem 15Q

 PROBLEM 15Q

Explain the difference between a Bohr orbit and a quantum-mechanical orbital.

Step-by-Step Solution:
Step 1 of 3

Solution 15Q

The difference between a Bohr orbit and a quantum-mechanical orbital :

Bohr orbit

Quantum - mechanical orbital

Bohr orbit has got an electron orbiting in a circle around the nucleus. The electrons can only orbit stably, without radiating, in certain orbits (called by Bohr the "stationary orbits") at a certain discrete set of distances from the nucleus. It is like a planet’s path around the sun in the solar system.

There is no single location of the electron, but instead there is a probability density function, called the wave function, which gives the chance that you will find the electron at any given point. i.e, an atomic orbital is a mathematical function that describes the wave-like behavior of either one electron or a pair of electrons in an atom.

Here, there are only discrete energy levels, corresponding to one sinusoidal wave as the electron goes around a single orbit, then two sinusoidal waves as the electron goes around a single orbit, then three and continues.

Here, the wave function is smooth and nonzero all around the nucleus rather than just nonzero in a little ring around the nucleus. It stretches on forever, although the probability drops off drastically as the electron gets much further away from the nucleus than the radius determined by the Bohr model. There are still discrete energy states, which correspond well to the Bohr model.

It represents two dimensional motion of electrons.

It represents three dimensional motion of electrons.

Orbitals are directional in nature except ‘s’ orbital.

Orbits are non directional

Step 2 of 3

Chapter 9, Problem 15Q is Solved
Step 3 of 3

Textbook: Introductory Chemistry
Edition: 5
Author: Nivaldo J Tro
ISBN: 9780321910295

Introductory Chemistry was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321910295. Since the solution to 15Q from 9 chapter was answered, more than 336 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 15Q from chapter: 9 was answered by , our top Chemistry solution expert on 05/06/17, 06:45PM. This full solution covers the following key subjects: Bohr, difference, explain, mechanical, orbit. This expansive textbook survival guide covers 19 chapters, and 2046 solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Introductory Chemistry, edition: 5. The answer to “Explain the difference between a Bohr orbit and a quantum-mechanical orbital.” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 11 words.

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Solved: Explain the difference between a Bohr orbit and a quantum-mechanical orbital