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What happens to the volume of air as it rises? What

Conceptual Physics | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321909107 | Authors: Paul G. Hewitt ISBN: 9780321909107 29

Solution for problem 6RCQ Chapter 16

Conceptual Physics | 12th Edition

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Conceptual Physics | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321909107 | Authors: Paul G. Hewitt

Conceptual Physics | 12th Edition

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Problem 6RCQ

Problem 6RCQ

What happens to the volume of air as it rises? What happens to its temperature?

Step-by-Step Solution:
Step 1 of 3

Chapter 15: Mistakes, Fraud, and Voluntary Consent Section 1 Voluntary Agreement to a preposition or an act of another. The lack of Voluntary Consent can be used as a defense against the contract.  A valid contract is unenforceable if the parties have not agreed to its terms. Mistake of Fact- this is the only thing that makes a contract voidable and it must involve material of fact. 1. Bilaterial Mistake- both parties mistaken (“no true meeting of the mines”). Contract can be rescinded by either party. 2. Unilateral Mistake- One party mistaken. Contract enforceable Mistake of Value- when the value of the object is worth a different amount in the future Section 2 Fraudulent Misrepresentation- when someone misrepresents something knowing they are acting in fraud. 1. A misrepresentation of a material fact must occur. Misrepresentation by Conduct- when a party takes a specific action to conceal a fact that is material to the contract Statements of Opinion and Representations of Future Facts- are not subject to claims of fraud. Misrepresentation of Law- does not entitle a party to relief from a contract. Except when the misrepresenting party is in a profession that is known to require greater knowledge than the average individual Misrepresentation by Silence- Failure to disclose material facts about its value.  Latent Defects- disclose information about a material’s defects if buyer is unable to see it  Fiduciary relationship- between partners e.g. physician & patient, attorney & client 2. There must be an intent to deceive. Scienter- also known as “guilty knowledge”, a party knowingly puts forth false statements about their knowledge or personal investigation of material without regard to whether it is true or false. Innocent Misrepresentation- (NOT FRAUD) if a person makes a statement that she or he believes to be true but that actually misrepresents material facts. Contract can then be rescinded but there will be NO monetary damages. Negligent Misrepresentation- misrepresentation through carelessness although the party highly believed it to be true e.g. operator of a weight scale weighs materials but the scale has not been checked for years and it is defect 3. The innocent party must justifiably rely on the misrepresentation. Justifiable Reliance- The deceived party must have a justifiable reliance for relying on the misrepresentation. If a party knows for a fact that something is not true but they still entered into the contract then it cannot be a justifiable misrepresentation. 4. To collect damages, a party must have been harmed as a result of the misrepresentation. Section 3 Undue Influence- In a contract, when one party can greatly influence another party then it lacks voluntary consent so this contract becomes voidable.  A contract entered into under excessive or undue influence lacks voluntary consent and is therefore voidable.  Those under the care of psychiatrists, Elderly people, Minors, Mentally incompetent people, Those under the care of physicians, under the care of psychologists, under guardianships  If a contract enriches the dominant party, the court will often presume undue influence Section 4 Duress- the use of threats to force a party into a contract is not voluntary. It must render the person incapable of exercising free will in order for it to fall under Duress. It is also a defense to the enforcement of a contract and recission  Economic duress- economic need is not sufficient to constitute duress Section 5 Adhesion Contracts- A “standard-form” contract, such as that between a large retailer and a consumer, in which the stronger party dictates the terms. Contains FINE PRINT  unconscionability under Section 2–302 of the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) applies only to contracts for the sale of goods  seller takes advantage of a buyer Chapter 15: Mistakes, Fraud, and Voluntary Consent Section 1 Voluntary Agreement to a preposition or an act of another. The lack of Voluntary Consent can be used as a defense against the contract.  A valid contract is unenforceable if the parties have not agreed to its terms. Mistake of Fact- this is the only thing that makes a contract voidable and it must involve material of fact. 1. Bilaterial Mistake- both parties mistaken (“no true meeting of the mines”). Contract can be rescinded by either party. 2. Unilateral Mistake- One party mistaken. Contract enforceable Mistake of Value- when the value of the object is worth a different amount in the future Section 2 Fraudulent Misrepresentation- when someone misrepresents something knowing they are acting in fraud. 1. A misrepresentation of a material fact must occur. Misrepresentation by Conduct- when a party takes a specific action to conceal a fact that is material to the contract Statements of Opinion and Representations of Future Facts- are not subject to claims of fraud. Misrepresentation of Law- does not entitle a party to relief from a contract. Except when the misrepresenting party is in a profession that is known to require greater knowledge than the average individual Misrepresentation by Silence- Failure to disclose material facts about its value.  Latent Defects- disclose information about a material’s defects if buyer is unable to see it  Fiduciary relationship- between partners e.g. physician & patient, attorney & client 2. There must be an intent to deceive. Scienter- also known as “guilty knowledge”, a party knowingly puts forth false statements about their knowledge or personal investigation of material without regard to whether it is true or false. Innocent Misrepresentation- (NOT FRAUD) if a person makes a statement that she or he believes to be true but that actually misrepresents material facts. Contract can then be rescinded but there will be NO monetary damages. Negligent Misrepresentation- misrepresentation through carelessness although the party highly believed it to be true e.g. operator of a weight scale weighs materials but the scale has not been checked for years and it is defect 3. The innocent party must justifiably rely on the misrepresentation. Justifiable Reliance- The deceived party must have a justifiable reliance for relying on the misrepresentation. If a party knows for a fact that something is not true but they still entered into the contract then it cannot be a justifiable misrepresentation. 4. To collect damages, a party must have been harmed as a result of the misrepresentation. Section 3 Undue Influence- In a contract, when one party can greatly influence another party then it lacks voluntary consent so this contract becomes voidable.  A contract entered into under excessive or undue influence lacks voluntary consent and is therefore voidable.  Those under the care of psychiatrists, Elderly people, Minors, Mentally incompetent people, Those under the care of physicians, under the care of psychologists, under guardianships  If a contract enriches the dominant party, the court will often presume undue influence Section 4 Duress- the use of threats to force a party into a contract is not voluntary. It must render the person incapable of exercising free will in order for it to fall under Duress. It is also a defense to the enforcement of a contract and recission  Economic duress- economic need is not sufficient to constitute duress Section 5 Adhesion Contracts- A “standard-form” contract, such as that between a large retailer and a consumer, in which the stronger party dictates the terms. Contains FINE PRINT  unconscionability under Section 2–302 of the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) applies only to contracts for the sale of goods  seller takes advantage of a buyer

Step 2 of 3

Chapter 16, Problem 6RCQ is Solved
Step 3 of 3

Textbook: Conceptual Physics
Edition: 12
Author: Paul G. Hewitt
ISBN: 9780321909107

This full solution covers the following key subjects: happens, rcq, its, air, rises. This expansive textbook survival guide covers 45 chapters, and 4650 solutions. Since the solution to 6RCQ from 16 chapter was answered, more than 426 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Conceptual Physics, edition: 12. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 6RCQ from chapter: 16 was answered by , our top Physics solution expert on 04/03/17, 08:01AM. Conceptual Physics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321909107. The answer to “What happens to the volume of air as it rises? What happens to its temperature?” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 15 words.

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