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Firemen use a high-pressure hose to shoot a stream of

University Physics | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321675460 | Authors: Hugh D. Young, Roger A. Freedman ISBN: 9780321675460 31

Solution for problem 22E Chapter 3

University Physics | 13th Edition

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University Physics | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321675460 | Authors: Hugh D. Young, Roger A. Freedman

University Physics | 13th Edition

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Problem 22E

Firemen use a high-pressure hose to shoot a stream of water at a burning building. The water has a speed of 25.0 m/s as it leaves the end of the hose and then exhibits projectile motion. The firemen adjust the angle of elevation ? of the hose until the water takes 3.00 s to reach a building 45.0 m away. Ignore air resistance; assume that the end of the hose is at ground level. (a) Find ?. (b) Find the speed and acceleration of the water at the highest point in its trajectory. (c) How high above the ground does the water strike the building, and how fast is it moving just before it hits the building?

Step-by-Step Solution:

Solution 22 E Step 1 : In this question, we need to find the Angle of incident Find the speed and acceleration of water at the highest point in trajectory How high above the ground the water strikes the building and how fast is it moving just before it hits the building

Step 2 of 7

Chapter 3, Problem 22E is Solved
Step 3 of 7

Textbook: University Physics
Edition: 13
Author: Hugh D. Young, Roger A. Freedman
ISBN: 9780321675460

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Firemen use a high-pressure hose to shoot a stream of