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Why are cars designed to crumple in front and back for

University Physics | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321675460 | Authors: Hugh D. Young, Roger A. Freedman ISBN: 9780321675460 31

Solution for problem 22DQ Chapter 4

University Physics | 13th Edition

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University Physics | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321675460 | Authors: Hugh D. Young, Roger A. Freedman

University Physics | 13th Edition

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Problem 22DQ

Why are cars designed to crumple in front and back for safety? Why not for side collisions and rollovers?

Step-by-Step Solution:
Step 1 of 3

Solution 22DQ Crumple zones are zones built into cars that crumple in a controlled manner. The main crumple zones are at the front and the rear of a vehicle. On impact, they crumple up in a controlled manner, which stops the force energy reaching the occupants and injuring them. The crumple zone dissipates the energy. Advantage :they save lives by stopping forceful energy. In the case of the side of the car: if the side doors are crumple then the people in the car would be crash because there is not much space for the crumble zone to absorb the force and redistribute. also, if the roof of the car is crumple, then when the car collapses , people in the car will be crash. we want the collision force to be far away from the passengers , and the way that the crumble zone work is when the car hit something, the crumble zone reduces the initial force of the crash, and they redistribute the force before it reaches. Hence the cars are designed to crumple in front and back for safety. Most accidents are rear impacts. Besides that there is no place on the top or side to put something to crumple. In many cases they say that with a side or top impact you are safer if the car doesn't have a hard jerk which would be the side effect of solid bars. Apparently it breaks your neck a lot(not sure if i believe this or not but I am not an automotive engineer

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Chapter 4, Problem 22DQ is Solved
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Textbook: University Physics
Edition: 13
Author: Hugh D. Young, Roger A. Freedman
ISBN: 9780321675460

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Why are cars designed to crumple in front and back for