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a star 1000 times brighter than our Sun (that is, emitting

Physics: Principles with Applications | 6th Edition | ISBN: 9780130606204 | Authors: Douglas C. Giancoli ISBN: 9780130606204 3

Solution for problem 31PE Chapter 7

Physics: Principles with Applications | 6th Edition

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Physics: Principles with Applications | 6th Edition | ISBN: 9780130606204 | Authors: Douglas C. Giancoli

Physics: Principles with Applications | 6th Edition

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Problem 31PE

a star 1000 times brighter than our Sun (that is, emitting 1000 times the power) suddenly goes supernova. Using data from Table 7.3: (a) By what factor does its power output increase? (b) How many times brighter than our entire Milky Way galaxy is the supernova? (c) Based on your answers, discuss whether it should be possible to observe supernovas in distant galaxies. Note that there are on the order of 1011 observable galaxies, the average brightness of which is somewhat less than our own galaxy.

Step-by-Step Solution:

Step-by-step solution Step 1 of 3 (a) Refers to the table 7.3 provided in the textbook Power output of the supernova is . As, brightness is directly proportional to the power output so the power output of the star is 1000 times the power output of our sun. Since, power output of our sun is Therefore, the power output of the star is Compare the power output of the star to the power output of the supernova The factor by which the power output star increases is . Step 2 of 3 (b) The power output of the Milky Way galaxy is and the power output of the supernova is As, the brightness is directly proportional to the power output Ratio of brightness of the Milky Way galaxy to the brightness of supernova is The supernova is five times brighter than the Milky Way galaxy.

Step 3 of 3

Chapter 7, Problem 31PE is Solved
Textbook: Physics: Principles with Applications
Edition: 6
Author: Douglas C. Giancoli
ISBN: 9780130606204

This full solution covers the following key subjects: times, our, power, supernova, brighter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers 35 chapters, and 3914 solutions. Since the solution to 31PE from 7 chapter was answered, more than 313 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. Physics: Principles with Applications was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780130606204. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 31PE from chapter: 7 was answered by , our top Physics solution expert on 03/03/17, 03:53PM. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Physics: Principles with Applications, edition: 6. The answer to “a star 1000 times brighter than our Sun (that is, emitting 1000 times the power) suddenly goes supernova. Using data from Table 7.3: (a) By what factor does its power output increase? (b) How many times brighter than our entire Milky Way galaxy is the supernova? (c) Based on your answers, discuss whether it should be possible to observe supernovas in distant galaxies. Note that there are on the order of 1011 observable galaxies, the average brightness of which is somewhat less than our own galaxy.” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 86 words.

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