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BIO There is a maximum depth at which a diver can breathe

University Physics | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321675460 | Authors: Hugh D. Young, Roger A. Freedman ISBN: 9780321675460 31

Solution for problem 17E Chapter 12

University Physics | 13th Edition

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University Physics | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321675460 | Authors: Hugh D. Young, Roger A. Freedman

University Physics | 13th Edition

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Problem 17E

BIO There is a maximum depth at which a diver can breathe through a snorkel tube (?Fig. E12.17?) because as the depth increases, so does the pressure difference, which tends to collapse the diver’s lungs. Since the snorkel connects the air in the lungs to the atmosphere at the surface, the pressure inside the lungs is atmospheric pressure. What is the external– internal pressure difference when the diver’s lungs are at a depth of 6.1 m (about 20 ft)? Assume that the diver is in fresh-water. (A scuba diver breathing from com-pressed air tanks can operate at greater depths than can a snorkeler, since the pressure of the air inside the scuba diver’s lungs increases to match the external pressure of the water.)

Step-by-Step Solution:

Solution 17E Step 1 of 3: The absolute pressure P(d) at a depth d inside a fluid with density , is greater than the pressure at the surface(P 0 by an amount gd. Also the pressure is same at any two points at the same level in the fluid, irrespective of the shape of the container. External Absolute Pressure at depth d, P(d) = P 0gd……………...1 Similarly the pressure of the lungs is same as that of the surface pressure(atmospheric pressure) P = P ……………….2 lungs 0 Step 2 of 3: Given data, Depth d=6.1 m 3 Density of fresh water, = 1000 kg/m 2 Acceleration due to gravity, g= 9.8m/s To find, The external and internal pressure difference(gauge pressure),P = P(d)-P lungs=

Step 3 of 3

Chapter 12, Problem 17E is Solved
Textbook: University Physics
Edition: 13
Author: Hugh D. Young, Roger A. Freedman
ISBN: 9780321675460

This full solution covers the following key subjects: diver, pressure, Lungs, air, depth. This expansive textbook survival guide covers 26 chapters, and 2929 solutions. Since the solution to 17E from 12 chapter was answered, more than 598 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: University Physics, edition: 13. University Physics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321675460. The answer to “BIO There is a maximum depth at which a diver can breathe through a snorkel tube (?Fig. E12.17?) because as the depth increases, so does the pressure difference, which tends to collapse the diver’s lungs. Since the snorkel connects the air in the lungs to the atmosphere at the surface, the pressure inside the lungs is atmospheric pressure. What is the external– internal pressure difference when the diver’s lungs are at a depth of 6.1 m (about 20 ft)? Assume that the diver is in fresh-water. (A scuba diver breathing from com-pressed air tanks can operate at greater depths than can a snorkeler, since the pressure of the air inside the scuba diver’s lungs increases to match the external pressure of the water.)” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 123 words. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 17E from chapter: 12 was answered by , our top Physics solution expert on 05/06/17, 06:07PM.

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