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Show that a three-dimensional 2 n × 2n × 2 n checkerboard

Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9780073383095 | Authors: Kenneth Rosen ISBN: 9780073383095 37

Solution for problem 79E Chapter 5.1

Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications | 7th Edition

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Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9780073383095 | Authors: Kenneth Rosen

Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications | 7th Edition

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Problem 79E

Show that a three-dimensional 2 n × 2n × 2 n checkerboard with one 1 × 1 × 1 cube missing can be completely covered by 2 × 2 × 2 cubes with one l×l×l cube removed.

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Feb. 22 The Ethical Life: Faring Well and Getting What You Want (Heathwood)  The “good” life 31 o Morally good Nonmorally good o Objectivists – pleasure, friendship, knowledge, freedom, virtue  Subjectivism about welfare 31 o “Something we get in life benefits us when and only when we have an interest in it, or want it, or have some other positive attitude towards it” 31  Welfare 32 o What things in life are ultimately to our benefit o What things make us better off o What makes a life a “good” life o What does it mean to fare well o Moral virtue 32  Sometimes doing good is of no benefit to the do-gooder o Excellence 32  A life that manifests excellence seems to be better, but an activity’s being excellent isn’t the same thing as its benefitting the person doing it o Meaning 33  A meaningful life is separate from having meaning o Things that tend to cause someone’s life to be improved 33  What things make us better off in themselves  Intrinsically good rather than instrumentally good (good for us because of what they lead to – ex: medicine)  Intrinsically good things 34 o Happiness, knowledge, love, freedom, friendship, appreciating beauty, creative activity, being respected o These are things we tend to want/value in our lives, and things we want/value for their own sakes o Such desires seem reasonable – it makes sense to want them  Subjectivists vs objectivists 34/35 o Objectivists – a person can be benefitted when they get things that they in no way want  Freedom itself makes your life better, whether you want it or not o Subjectivists – if something is truly a benefit to someone, it must be something they want/like/care about, or something that helps them get something they want/life/care about o Morality – objectivism o Welfare – subjectivism  Desires  genuine desires  actual desires 40  Desire theory of welfare 37/38 o Human welfare consists in the satisfaction of desire o Desire or wanting is the special positive attitude to have towards things o How good/bad a desire satisfaction/frustration is for its subject is a function of the strength of the desire o “Want” 38  Behavioral – we voluntarily do things Feb. 22  **Genuinely attracted to it, genuinely appeals to us  Pleasure and happiness 38/39 o Hedonism: pleasure is the only thing that’s intrinsically good for us  Pleasure is good, pain is bad o Pleasure is an indefinable feeling/sensation o Pleasure is a positive attitude – involves desire  Informed desire theory 40 o What determines our welfare is our idealized desires, not our actual desires o Idealized desires: desires we would have if we knew all the facts, were vividly appreciating them, and were thinking rationally

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Chapter 5.1, Problem 79E is Solved
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Textbook: Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications
Edition: 7
Author: Kenneth Rosen
ISBN: 9780073383095

The full step-by-step solution to problem: 79E from chapter: 5.1 was answered by , our top Math solution expert on 06/21/17, 07:45AM. The answer to “Show that a three-dimensional 2 n × 2n × 2 n checkerboard with one 1 × 1 × 1 cube missing can be completely covered by 2 × 2 × 2 cubes with one l×l×l cube removed.” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 37 words. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications, edition: 7. Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073383095. This full solution covers the following key subjects: Cube, Cubes, covered, checkerboard, completely. This expansive textbook survival guide covers 101 chapters, and 4221 solutions. Since the solution to 79E from 5.1 chapter was answered, more than 338 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer.

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Show that a three-dimensional 2 n × 2n × 2 n checkerboard