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As the car travels forward at 80 ft>s on a wet road, due

Engineering Mechanics: Statics & Dynamics | 14th Edition | ISBN: 9780133951929 | Authors: Russell C. Hibbeler ISBN: 9780133951929 123

Solution for problem 16-95 Chapter 16

Engineering Mechanics: Statics & Dynamics | 14th Edition

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Engineering Mechanics: Statics & Dynamics | 14th Edition | ISBN: 9780133951929 | Authors: Russell C. Hibbeler

Engineering Mechanics: Statics & Dynamics | 14th Edition

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Problem 16-95

As the car travels forward at 80 ft>s on a wet road, due to slipping, the rear wheels have an angular velocity v = 100 rad>s. Determine the speeds of points A, B, and C caused by the motion.

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Gender in the Economy Week 10 The Effect of Sexual Orientation on Earnings  In 1995 people were able to test this for the first time Earning Gap  The econometric technique used to test for discrimination against women is also used for other groups  Sexual orientation: wage gaps for LGB individuals compared to heterosexuals  Research shows that o Gay men earn less than heterosexual men o Gay married men earn more than unmarried heterosexual men o Lesbian women earn more than heterosexual women  Possible explanations: career values, occupation, discrimination The Earning Effects of Sexual Orientation  Economist use survey data where respondents indicate sexual orientation and wages o They don’t directly ask sexual orientation, ask behavior patterns instead (sex and sex of partners)  Researchers run a regression on wages using all of the available information about respondents  When controlling for everything else: o Gay men earn 14-16% less than heterosexual men o Lesbians earn 20-34% more than heterosexual women and earn almost as much as heterosexual men  Possible explanations: o Lesbian women may be expected to have higher career values (masculine characteristics) o Homosexuals might be in different occupations than their heterosexual counterparts o There might be discrimination going on against gay men and heterosexual women Culture and Gender Introduction  In a lot of cultures, being female is associated with care for others (children, elderly, sick, etc.)  Women are expected to care more about family responsibility  Women who seem independent and ambitious/men who seem dependent and family oriented go against social norm “Doing Gender”  Doing gender: interpersonal enactment of culturally specified roles  Doing gender involves assigning tasks such as care  Someone who specializes in home or care work (even in the labor market) is typically in a weaker bargaining position within the family  Employees in care work are typically paid less than others with the same level of education and same hours o Women are disproportionately concentrated in these jobs Caring Labor  How does care depart from traditional economic definitions of work o Care work requires personal attention o Face to face, first name basis o Care is often for people who cannot clearly express their own needs o Sense of emotional attachment to person being cared for  The meaning of care: feminists say it is more than a feeling, it’s a responsibility  Many care services involve a sense of connection with the care recipient Care Work  Care is production for use rather than exchange  Is care work more enjoyable or fulfilling than other types of work o Emotional labor is involved o One could argue that caring for other people provides a sense of satisfaction  Caring labor is usually located outside the labor market Care and Utility Maximization  Neoclassical economics o Under neoclassical theory, altruism is only acknowledged within the family o The notion that a paid worker would care about the person receiving services confounds the self-interest assumption contribute to neoclassical theory  Caring labor implies that care givers get some utility from improving the welfare of others Gender and Norms of Care  Evolution of social norms: groups seek to enforce norms and preferences they find beneficial  May reflect collective forms of social power  Feminists theory emphasizes coercion in social norms Gender in the Economy Week 10 The Effect of Sexual Orientation on Earnings  In 1995 people were able to test this for the first time Earning Gap  The econometric technique used to test for discrimination against women is also used for other groups  Sexual orientation: wage gaps for LGB individuals compared to heterosexuals  Research shows that o Gay men earn less than heterosexual men o Gay married men earn more than unmarried heterosexual men o Lesbian women earn more than heterosexual women  Possible explanations: career values, occupation, discrimination The Earning Effects of Sexual Orientation  Economist use survey data where respondents indicate sexual orientation and wages o They don’t directly ask sexual orientation, ask behavior patterns instead (sex and sex of partners)  Researchers run a regression on wages using all of the available information about respondents  When controlling for everything else: o Gay men earn 14-16% less than heterosexual men o Lesbians earn 20-34% more than heterosexual women and earn almost as much as heterosexual men  Possible explanations: o Lesbian women may be expected to have higher career values (masculine characteristics) o Homosexuals might be in different occupations than their heterosexual counterparts o There might be discrimination going on against gay men and heterosexual women Culture and Gender Introduction  In a lot of cultures, being female is associated with care for others (children, elderly, sick, etc.)  Women are expected to care more about family responsibility  Women who seem independent and ambitious/men who seem dependent and family oriented go against social norm “Doing Gender”  Doing gender: interpersonal enactment of culturally specified roles  Doing gender involves assigning tasks such as care  Someone who specializes in home or care work (even in the labor market) is typically in a weaker bargaining position within the family  Employees in care work are typically paid less than others with the same level of education and same hours o Women are disproportionately concentrated in these jobs Caring Labor  How does care depart from traditional economic definitions of work o Care work requires personal attention o Face to face, first name basis o Care is often for people who cannot clearly express their own needs o Sense of emotional attachment to person being cared for  The meaning of care: feminists say it is more than a feeling, it’s a responsibility  Many care services involve a sense of connection with the care recipient Care Work  Care is production for use rather than exchange  Is care work more enjoyable or fulfilling than other types of work o Emotional labor is involved o One could argue that caring for other people provides a sense of satisfaction  Caring labor is usually located outside the labor market Care and Utility Maximization  Neoclassical economics o Under neoclassical theory, altruism is only acknowledged within the family o The notion that a paid worker would care about the person receiving services confounds the self-interest assumption contribute to neoclassical theory  Caring labor implies that care givers get some utility from improving the welfare of others Gender and Norms of Care  Evolution of social norms: groups seek to enforce norms and preferences they find beneficial  May reflect collective forms of social power  Feminists theory emphasizes coercion in social norms

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Chapter 16, Problem 16-95 is Solved
Step 3 of 3

Textbook: Engineering Mechanics: Statics & Dynamics
Edition: 14
Author: Russell C. Hibbeler
ISBN: 9780133951929

Since the solution to 16-95 from 16 chapter was answered, more than 398 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. The answer to “As the car travels forward at 80 ft>s on a wet road, due to slipping, the rear wheels have an angular velocity v = 100 rad>s. Determine the speeds of points A, B, and C caused by the motion.” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 39 words. This full solution covers the following key subjects: angular, Car, caused, determine, due. This expansive textbook survival guide covers 22 chapters, and 2358 solutions. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 16-95 from chapter: 16 was answered by , our top Engineering and Tech solution expert on 11/10/17, 05:20PM. Engineering Mechanics: Statics & Dynamics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780133951929. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Engineering Mechanics: Statics & Dynamics , edition: 14.

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As the car travels forward at 80 ft>s on a wet road, due