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Visualizing ConceptsConsider the jar of jelly beans in the

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910417 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus ISBN: 9780321910417 77

Solution for problem 11E Chapter 1

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition

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Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910417 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition

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Problem 11E

Visualizing Concepts

Consider the jar of jelly beans in the photo. To get an estimate of the number of beans in the jar you weigh six beans and obtain masses of 3.15, 3.12, 2.98, 3.14, 3.02, and 3.09 g. Then you weigh the jar with all the beans in it, and obtain a mass of 2082 g. The empty jar has a mass of 653 g. Based on these data estimate the number of beans in the jar. Justify the number of significant figures you use in your estimate. [Section]

Step-by-Step Solution:

Problem 11EVisualizing ConceptsConsider the jar of jelly beans in the photo. To get an estimate of the number of beans in the jaryou weigh six beans and obtain masses of 3.15, 3.12, 2.98, 3.14, 3.02, and 3.09 g. Then youweigh the jar with all the beans in it, and obtain a mass of 2082 g. The empty jar has a mass of653 g. Based on these data estimate the number of beans in the jar. Justify the number ofsignificant figures you use in your estimate. [Section] Step-by-step solution Step 1 of 3 Average can be calculated as sum of all samples divided by number of samples.Where A is the average, n is the number of terms and x the value of each sample. i

Step 2 of 3

Chapter 1, Problem 11E is Solved
Step 3 of 3

Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 13
Author: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus
ISBN: 9780321910417

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Visualizing ConceptsConsider the jar of jelly beans in the