×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Chemistry: The Central Science - 13 Edition - Chapter 1 - Problem 34e
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Chemistry: The Central Science - 13 Edition - Chapter 1 - Problem 34e

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

Solved: Units and Measurement (Section)Silicon for

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910417 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus ISBN: 9780321910417 77

Solution for problem 34E Chapter 1

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition

  • Textbook Solutions
  • 2901 Step-by-step solutions solved by professors and subject experts
  • Get 24/7 help from StudySoup virtual teaching assistants
Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910417 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition

4 5 1 259 Reviews
14
1
Problem 34E

Units and Measurement (Section)

Silicon for computer chips is grown in large cylinders called “boules” that are 300 mm in diameter and 2 m in length, as shown. The density of silicon is 2.33 g/cm3. Silicon wafers for making integrated circuits are sliced from a 2.0 m boule and are typically 0.75 mm thick and 300 mm in diameter, (a) How many wafers can be cut from a single boule? (b) What is the mass of a silicon wafer? (The volume of a cylinder is given by , where r is the radius and h is its height.)

Step-by-Step Solution:
Step 1 of 3

RTV 2100 News Writing: I. Print news is interactive A. People can choose which story to read first B. They can choose how much of an article to read C. They can read a story at their own pace D. They can stop reading at any time E. They can reread something if they didn’t understand II. Broadcast news is not as interactive A. The producer decides the order of the stories B. The reporter decides the pace of the info C. The audience has to understand immediately what they saw or heard and cannot go back The Internet: I. The internet is a combination of radio, newspapers, and television A. You can read it B. You can listen to it C. You can watch it D. And it can go with you anywhere II. AND- it is what all of you will be doing, where the jobs are, and what you already enjoy We May Focus on Broadcast: I. But there are a declining number of jobs in broadcast A. According to the US Bureau of labor Statistics News analysts, reporters, and correspondents held about 69,300 jobs in 2008 i) 58,500 in 2010 and 57,600 in 2012 II. But, the skills you learn are transferable to the web Broadcast script writing: I. Different from writing an essay for class, a poem, novel, or for online A. Not AP Style either II. Every station has their own style A. Some use sentence case and some use uppercase Writing for broadcast is about communicating: I. What you write for broadcast is only read by one person and sometimes that person is you A. People listening or watching cannot go back and reread what you just said i) So you need to be clear, simple and descriptive ii) This ability translates to any job iii) It is also the style of writing for the web a) It is also where there are jobs II. How to communicate A. From one person to another person through mediated channels B. Two forms of communication i) Interpersonal comm. ii) Mass comm. Interpersonal communication: I. Interpersonal communication- communication with a single individual or small group A. You have been communicating from the day you were born i) It is our ability to use words and express meaning that makes human unique Mass communication: I. Mass comm. - Communication to a lot of people at the same time though mass production and mass distribution A. Mass communication has done away with the problems of time and space and makes instant communication possible allowing the audience to experience the sights and sounds crated in another place at the same time i) Even more with online and social media Mass Communication Process: 1. Source- The originator of the message 2. Message- The info to communicate 3. Channel- The means with which you communicate 4. Receiver- The audience you are communicating to 5. Purpose- The reason you wrote the message 6. Effects- The effect the message has on the audience 7. Feedback- Communication from the receiver back to the source Importance of communication: I. When you control communication, you control everything A. Despots fear the words of the articulate i) Revolutions are achieved as much with words as weapons News and News Values: “News is the first draft of history” – Philip Graham (Washington Post reporter) Why do people care about the news: I. Uses and gratifications theory says people consume news and information for 4 basic reasons A. To be aware of dangers and opportunities in the world B. For entertainment C. To feel connected to other people D. To reinforce feelings and opinions II. In 1957, political economist Anthony Downs noted there were 4 reasons people seek the news A. To help them smarter consumer decision B. To improve their workplace productivity C. To entertain themselves D. To make voting decisions Information Consumers: I. We (collective) need to rethink media, journalism and reporting A. Because the media is doing a bad job i) But, we are also to blame II. We do not know enough and the media knows this so they tell us little and we learn less A. Bias in the media only works if we are uninformed RTV 2100 News Writing: I. Print news is interactive A. People can choose which story to read first B. They can choose how much of an article to read C. They can read a story at their own pace D. They can stop reading at any time E. They can reread something if they didn’t understand II. Broadcast news is not as interactive A. The producer decides the order of the stories B. The reporter decides the pace of the info C. The audience has to understand immediately what they saw or heard and cannot go back The Internet: I. The internet is a combination of radio, newspapers, and television A. You can read it B. You can listen to it C. You can watch it D. And it can go with you anywhere II. AND- it is what all of you will be doing, where the jobs are, and what you already enjoy We May Focus on Broadcast: I. But there are a declining number of jobs in broadcast A. According to the US Bureau of labor Statistics News analysts, reporters, and correspondents held about 69,300 jobs in 2008 i) 58,500 in 2010 and 57,600 in 2012 II. But, the skills you learn are transferable to the web Broadcast script writing: I. Different from writing an essay for class, a poem, novel, or for online A. Not AP Style either II. Every station has their own style A. Some use sentence case and some use uppercase Writing for broadcast is about communicating: I. What you write for broadcast is only read by one person and sometimes that person is you A. People listening or watching cannot go back and reread what you just said i) So you need to be clear, simple and descriptive ii) This ability translates to any job iii) It is also the style of writing for the web a) It is also where there are jobs II. How to communicate A. From one person to another person through mediated channels B. Two forms of communication i) Interpersonal comm. ii) Mass comm. Interpersonal communication: I. Interpersonal communication- communication with a single individual or small group A. You have been communicating from the day you were born i) It is our ability to use words and express meaning that makes human unique Mass communication: I. Mass comm. - Communication to a lot of people at the same time though mass production and mass distribution A. Mass communication has done away with the problems of time and space and makes instant communication possible allowing the audience to experience the sights and sounds crated in another place at the same time i) Even more with online and social media Mass Communication Process: 1. Source- The originator of the message 2. Message- The info to communicate 3. Channel- The means with which you communicate 4. Receiver- The audience you are communicating to 5. Purpose- The reason you wrote the message 6. Effects- The effect the message has on the audience 7. Feedback- Communication from the receiver back to the source Importance of communication: I. When you control communication, you control everything A. Despots fear the words of the articulate i) Revolutions are achieved as much with words as weapons News and News Values: “News is the first draft of history” – Philip Graham (Washington Post reporter) Why do people care about the news: I. Uses and gratifications theory says people consume news and information for 4 basic reasons A. To be aware of dangers and opportunities in the world B. For entertainment C. To feel connected to other people D. To reinforce feelings and opinions II. In 1957, political economist Anthony Downs noted there were 4 reasons people seek the news A. To help them smarter consumer decision B. To improve their workplace productivity C. To entertain themselves D. To make voting decisions Information Consumers: I. We (collective) need to rethink media, journalism and reporting A. Because the media is doing a bad job i) But, we are also to blame II. We do not know enough and the media knows this so they tell us little and we learn less A. Bias in the media only works if we are uninformed

Step 2 of 3

Chapter 1, Problem 34E is Solved
Step 3 of 3

Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 13
Author: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus
ISBN: 9780321910417

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science, edition: 13. Chemistry: The Central Science was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321910417. Since the solution to 34E from 1 chapter was answered, more than 289 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. The answer to “Units and Measurement (Section)Silicon for computer chips is grown in large cylinders called “boules” that are 300 mm in diameter and 2 m in length, as shown. The density of silicon is 2.33 g/cm3. Silicon wafers for making integrated circuits are sliced from a 2.0 m boule and are typically 0.75 mm thick and 300 mm in diameter, (a) How many wafers can be cut from a single boule? (b) What is the mass of a silicon wafer? (The volume of a cylinder is given by , where r is the radius and h is its height.)” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 97 words. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 34E from chapter: 1 was answered by , our top Chemistry solution expert on 09/04/17, 09:30PM. This full solution covers the following key subjects: Silicon, boule, wafers, diameter, length. This expansive textbook survival guide covers 305 chapters, and 6352 solutions.

Other solutions

People also purchased

Related chapters

Unlock Textbook Solution

Enter your email below to unlock your verified solution to:

Solved: Units and Measurement (Section)Silicon for