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The following table gives data, in kJ, for a system

Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9781118412930 | Authors: Michael J. Moran ISBN: 9781118412930 139

Solution for problem 2.74 Chapter 2

Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics | 8th Edition

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Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9781118412930 | Authors: Michael J. Moran

Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics | 8th Edition

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Problem 2.74

The following table gives data, in kJ, for a system undergoing a power cycle consisting of four processes in series. Determine, the (a) missing table entries, each in kJ, and (b) the thermal efficiency

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Psychology & Culture Week 9 Notes Class #22 Emotion  Theoretical perspectives o James-Lange theory of emotions  Emotions are physiologically/bodily responses  Ex: you see a bear, how do you react  Anger situation distinct physiological state anger  Bodily response causes emotion  Evidence  The facial feedback hypothesis: we experience emotions as a result of the positions of our facial muscles  Ex: pen exercise holding a pen w/mouth o Holding between your teeth= evokes happy emotions because it engages same muscles when we smile o Holding w/nose & upper lip= evokes sad emotions because it engages same muscles when we frown  Facial Expressions o 6 basic emotions/facial expressions: happiness, sadness, fear, anger, surprise, disgust o Ekman & the universality perspective  If expressions are universal, then participants from different cultures will agree on the emotion being expressed o Identifying emotions in photograph  Study 1 (Ekman & Friesen, 1971)  Participants from U.S., Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Japan (WEIRD cultures)  Accuracy ranged from 63% (anger) to 97% (happy)  Study 2 (Ekman et al., 1969)  Papa New Guinea  Fore (from Papa New Guinea) told a story, identify corresponding facial expression (from photos) o Fore= “pre-literate” culture/society of Papa New Guinea  Accuracy (%): o Happiness- 92% o Sadness- 82% o Anger- 90% o Disgust- 85% o Fear- 93% o Surprise- 98%  Study 3 (Ekman et al., 1969)  Fore’s facial expressions of emotions are photographed, U.S. participants identify emotions in photos  Theoretical Perspectives o Two-Factor Theory of emotions  Emotions are interpretations of bodily responses  The importance of the source of bodily responses  Source unknown (or ambiguous) Interpret by looking to the situation  Appraisal: evaluation of what the situation/event means  *study by Schacter & Singer (1962)*  Appraisals- do they vary o No, in the sense that some situations means the same to everyone  Think: basic needs o Yes, in the sense that culture shapes our interpretations & resulting emotions  Ex: a shoe is thrown at you (video of President Bush)  Middle east= sign of disrespect  U.S.= amusement  Ex: writing in red ink  Korea= writing someone’s name in red ink AFTER they die it’s a sign of respect; writing someone’s name in red ink BEFORE they die is a sign of disrespect or is viewed as very negative  U.S.= associated with bad/negative feedback Class #23  Facial expressions- do they vary o Recap:  Cultural similarities (& some differences) in how we…  Recognize & produce facial expression  Appraise the situations that elicit emotions o What about…  How we display our emotions  Variations across cultures  How much do we regulate them  Does what we express via facial expressions accurately convey what we feel inside o Ekman and the universality perspective  If expressions are universal, then participants from different cultures will display the same expressions under the same situations  Study 4 (Ekman, 1972)  Two groups of U.S. & Japanese participants  First group viewed natural or stress-inducing film in room alone*  Facial expressions videotaped & judged by second group o What film is this participant watching  *measured accuracy of answer from second group  When viewing U.S. expressions: r= .77  When viewing Japanese expressions: r=.79  Then viewed stressful film in room with the experimenter o Experimenter= older male professor wearing a suit & lab coat o Predictions: U.S. show more disgust than Japanese o Facial expressions videotaped & compared o Why might people smile in this situation  Nervous reaction, reassure experimenter that they’re not disgusted at them because of video o Cultural display rules  Amplification (express more)  Deamplification (express less)  Neutralization (show nothing)  Masking (show something else)  Simulation (show even if not feeling)  *study 4 shows some deamplification/masking in Japanese participants o What cultural factors encourage the use of display rules What about immediate social factors  Job masking  Kid on Christmas simulation Class #24  Emotional experiences- do they vary o Similarity in physiological responses o The Minangkabau study (Levenson et al., 1992)  Participants were Minangkabau men and U.S. men & women  Given instructions re: expressions held for 10 minutes  “Wrinkle your nose & let your mouth open, pull your lower lip down…”  Measured heart rate, skin conductance and respiration  U.S. participants showed increased heart rate for each emotion as compared to the Minangkabau o Differences in physiological responses o How rude! (Anderson & Linden, 2008)  Chinese- & European-Canadians  Rude experimenter  Measured blood pressure & heart rate  Chinese-Canadians show faster decline in heart rate after dealing with the experimenter than the European-Canadians  Typical responses to an annoying situation:  Express, suppress, distract, & reappraisal  Why the differences  European-Canadians usually express emotions more  Chinese-Canadians engage in reappraisal

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Chapter 2, Problem 2.74 is Solved
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Textbook: Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics
Edition: 8
Author: Michael J. Moran
ISBN: 9781118412930

Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781118412930. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 2.74 from chapter: 2 was answered by , our top Engineering and Tech solution expert on 11/14/17, 08:39PM. The answer to “The following table gives data, in kJ, for a system undergoing a power cycle consisting of four processes in series. Determine, the (a) missing table entries, each in kJ, and (b) the thermal efficiency” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 34 words. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics, edition: 8. This full solution covers the following key subjects: Table, missing, data, determine, efficiency. This expansive textbook survival guide covers 14 chapters, and 1738 solutions. Since the solution to 2.74 from 2 chapter was answered, more than 441 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer.

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The following table gives data, in kJ, for a system