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Solved: A turboprop engine (Fig. 9.27a) consists of a

Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9781118412930 | Authors: Michael J. Moran ISBN: 9781118412930 139

Solution for problem 9.93 Chapter 9

Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics | 8th Edition

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Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9781118412930 | Authors: Michael J. Moran

Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics | 8th Edition

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Problem 9.93

A turboprop engine (Fig. 9.27a) consists of a diffuser, compressor, combustor, turbine, and nozzle. The turbine drives a propeller as well as the compressor. Air enters the diffuser at 12 lbf/in.2 , 4608R, with a volumetric flow rate of 23,330 ft3 /min and a velocity of 520 ft/s. In the diffuser, the air decelerates to negligible velocity. The compressor pressure ratio is 9, and the turbine inlet temperature is 21008R. The turbine exit pressure is 25 lbf/in.2 , and the air expands to 12 lbf/in.2 through a nozzle. The compressor and turbine each have an isentropic efficiency of 87%, and the nozzle has an isentropic efficiency of 95%. Combustion occurs at constant pressure. Flow through the diffuser is isentropic. Using an air-standard analysis, determine (a) the power delivered to the propeller, in hp. (b) the velocity at the nozzle exit, in ft/s. Neglect kinetic energy except at the diffuser inlet and the nozzle exit.

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Chapter 9, Problem 9.93 is Solved
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Textbook: Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics
Edition: 8
Author: Michael J. Moran
ISBN: 9781118412930

This full solution covers the following key subjects: nozzle, diffuser, turbine, air, compressor. This expansive textbook survival guide covers 14 chapters, and 1738 solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics, edition: 8. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 9.93 from chapter: 9 was answered by , our top Engineering and Tech solution expert on 11/14/17, 08:39PM. Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781118412930. The answer to “A turboprop engine (Fig. 9.27a) consists of a diffuser, compressor, combustor, turbine, and nozzle. The turbine drives a propeller as well as the compressor. Air enters the diffuser at 12 lbf/in.2 , 4608R, with a volumetric flow rate of 23,330 ft3 /min and a velocity of 520 ft/s. In the diffuser, the air decelerates to negligible velocity. The compressor pressure ratio is 9, and the turbine inlet temperature is 21008R. The turbine exit pressure is 25 lbf/in.2 , and the air expands to 12 lbf/in.2 through a nozzle. The compressor and turbine each have an isentropic efficiency of 87%, and the nozzle has an isentropic efficiency of 95%. Combustion occurs at constant pressure. Flow through the diffuser is isentropic. Using an air-standard analysis, determine (a) the power delivered to the propeller, in hp. (b) the velocity at the nozzle exit, in ft/s. Neglect kinetic energy except at the diffuser inlet and the nozzle exit.” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 154 words. Since the solution to 9.93 from 9 chapter was answered, more than 391 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer.

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Solved: A turboprop engine (Fig. 9.27a) consists of a