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Solution: Small argument approximations Consider the

Calculus: Early Transcendentals | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780321570567 | Authors: William L. Briggs, Lyle Cochran, Bernard Gillett ISBN: 9780321570567 2

Solution for problem 71E Chapter 9.1

Calculus: Early Transcendentals | 1st Edition

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Calculus: Early Transcendentals | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780321570567 | Authors: William L. Briggs, Lyle Cochran, Bernard Gillett

Calculus: Early Transcendentals | 1st Edition

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Problem 71E

Small argument approximations Consider the following common approximations when x is near zero.

a. Estimate f(0.1) and give the maximum error in the approximation.

b. Estimate f(0.2) and give the maximum error in the approximation.

\(f(x)=\cos x \approx 1-x^{2} / 2\)

Step-by-Step Solution:

Solution 71EStep 1:Given

Step 2 of 4

Chapter 9.1, Problem 71E is Solved
Step 3 of 4

Textbook: Calculus: Early Transcendentals
Edition: 1
Author: William L. Briggs, Lyle Cochran, Bernard Gillett
ISBN: 9780321570567

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Solution: Small argument approximations Consider the