×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Physics - Textbook Survival Guide
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Physics - Textbook Survival Guide

In a real hemoglobin molecule, The tendency of oxygen to

An Introduction to Thermal Physics | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780201380279 | Authors: Daniel V. Schroeder ISBN: 9780201380279 40

Solution for problem 2P Chapter 7

An Introduction to Thermal Physics | 1st Edition

  • Textbook Solutions
  • 2901 Step-by-step solutions solved by professors and subject experts
  • Get 24/7 help from StudySoup virtual teaching assistants
An Introduction to Thermal Physics | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780201380279 | Authors: Daniel V. Schroeder

An Introduction to Thermal Physics | 1st Edition

4 5 1 286 Reviews
14
0
Problem 2P

In a real hemoglobin molecule, The tendency of oxygen to bind to a heme site increases as the other three heme sites become occupied. To model this effect in a simple way, imagine that a hemoglobin molecule has just two sites, either or both of which can be occupied. This system has four possible states (with only oxygen present). Take the energy of the unoccupied state to be zero, the energies of the two singly occupied states to be −0.55 eV, and the energy of the doubly occupied state to be −1.3 eV (so the change in energy upon binding the second oxygen is −0.75 eV). As in the previous problem, calculate and plot the fraction of occupied sites as a function of The effective partial pressure of oxygen. Compare to the graph from the previous problem (for independent sites) . Can you think of why this behavior is preferable for the function of hemoglobin?

Step-by-Step Solution:
Step 1 of 3
Step 2 of 3

Chapter 7, Problem 2P is Solved
Step 3 of 3

Textbook: An Introduction to Thermal Physics
Edition: 1
Author: Daniel V. Schroeder
ISBN: 9780201380279

An Introduction to Thermal Physics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780201380279. The answer to “In a real hemoglobin molecule, The tendency of oxygen to bind to a heme site increases as the other three heme sites become occupied. To model this effect in a simple way, imagine that a hemoglobin molecule has just two sites, either or both of which can be occupied. This system has four possible states (with only oxygen present). Take the energy of the unoccupied state to be zero, the energies of the two singly occupied states to be ?0.55 eV, and the energy of the doubly occupied state to be ?1.3 eV (so the change in energy upon binding the second oxygen is ?0.75 eV). As in the previous problem, calculate and plot the fraction of occupied sites as a function of The effective partial pressure of oxygen. Compare to the graph from the previous problem (for independent sites) . Can you think of why this behavior is preferable for the function of hemoglobin?” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 155 words. This full solution covers the following key subjects: occupied, sites, oxygen, Energy, Hemoglobin. This expansive textbook survival guide covers 10 chapters, and 454 solutions. Since the solution to 2P from 7 chapter was answered, more than 349 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: An Introduction to Thermal Physics , edition: 1. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 2P from chapter: 7 was answered by , our top Physics solution expert on 07/05/17, 04:29AM.

Unlock Textbook Solution

Enter your email below to unlock your verified solution to:

In a real hemoglobin molecule, The tendency of oxygen to

×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Physics - Textbook Survival Guide
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Physics - Textbook Survival Guide
×
Reset your password