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Solved: Calculating a Root-Mean-Square SpeedCalculate the

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910417 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus ISBN: 9780321910417 77

Solution for problem 1PE Chapter 10.13SE

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition

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Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910417 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition

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Problem 1PE

Calculating a Root-Mean-Square Speed

Calculate the rms speed of the molecules in a sample of N2 gas at 25 °C.

Fill in the blanks for the following statement: The rms speed of the molecules in a sample of H2 gas at 300 K will be ____ times larger than the rms speed of O2 molecules at the same temperature, and the ratio urms(H2)/urms(O2) _____ with increasing temperature. (a) four, will not change, (b) four, will increase, (c) sixteen, will not change, (d) sixteen, will decrease (e) Not enough information is given to answer this question.

Step-by-Step Solution:
Step 1 of 3

Chapter 7.3 Intermolecular Forces: attractive forces between neighboring molecules -> London Dispersion, Dipole-Dipole, Hydrogen Bonding, and Ion-Dipole Van der Waals: attractive forces that act between atoms of molecules in a pure substance -> London Dispersion, Dipole-Dipole, Hydrogen Bonding London Dispersion Forces: coulombic attractions between instantaneous dipoles of molecules that is present in all molecules. larger molecule -> more polarizable -> stronger london dispersion force stronger force -> more attached -> higher boiling point

Step 2 of 3

Chapter 10.13SE, Problem 1PE is Solved
Step 3 of 3

Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 13
Author: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus
ISBN: 9780321910417

The full step-by-step solution to problem: 1PE from chapter: 10.13SE was answered by , our top Chemistry solution expert on 09/04/17, 09:30PM. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science, edition: 13. This full solution covers the following key subjects: . This expansive textbook survival guide covers 305 chapters, and 6352 solutions. Since the solution to 1PE from 10.13SE chapter was answered, more than 475 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. Chemistry: The Central Science was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321910417. The answer to “Calculating a Root-Mean-Square SpeedCalculate the rms speed of the molecules in a sample of N2 gas at 25 °C.Fill in the blanks for the following statement: The rms speed of the molecules in a sample of H2 gas at 300 K will be ____ times larger than the rms speed of O2 molecules at the same temperature, and the ratio urms(H2)/urms(O2) _____ with increasing temperature. (a) four, will not change, (b) four, will increase, (c) sixteen, will not change, (d) sixteen, will decrease (e) Not enough information is given to answer this question.” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 93 words.

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