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Solved: Rate Laws (Section)Consider a hypothetical

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910417 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus ISBN: 9780321910417 77

Solution for problem 28E Chapter 14

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition

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Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition | ISBN: 9780321910417 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus

Chemistry: The Central Science | 13th Edition

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Problem 28E

Rate Laws (Section)

Consider a hypothetical reaction between A. B. and C that is first order in A zero order in B. and second order in C. (a) Write the rate law for the reaction, (b) How does the rate change when [A] is doubled and the other reactant concentrations are held constant? (c) How does the rate change when [B] is tripled and the other reactant concentrations are held constant? (d) How does the rate change when [C] is tripled and the other reactant concentrations are held constant? (e) By what factor does the rate change when the concentrations of all three reactants are tripled? (f) By what factor does the rate change when the concentrations of all three reactants are cut in half?

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4/4/16 EXAMAPRIL14 th Ø 4/12NickTreichishostingareviewsession@415pminFulmer125 Ø 4/12Finneganishostingareviewsessioninthepit@7 Ø 4/11@515theChemclubishostingareviewsession AXE • • n=thenumberofbondinggroupsonthecentralatom • m=thenumberoflonepairsonthecentralatom • ANYtypeofbond(single,double,triple)isonebondinggroup • n+m=thenumberofelectrongroupsonthecentralatom ElectronGeometry • Thenumberofelectrongroupsdeterminesthis • Thereareonly5,seetable10.1 • Determinestheidealbondangles-elementstryandarrangethemselvesasfar awayfromeachotheraspossiblebecausetheelectronsrepulsethemselves MolecularGeometry(shape)-electrongeometryandthenumberoflonepairs determinethemoleculargeometry • Themolecularshape,thebonpolarities,andtheformalchargedistribution determinethemolecularpolarity 4/6/16 BondAngles • ElectronGeometrydeterminestheidealbondangles(theyareapproximate) Linear:180degreeangles Triganolplanar:120degreeangles Tetrahedral:109.5degreeangles Trigonalbipyramidal:90,120degreeangles Octahedral:90degreeangles • Lonepairstakeupmorespacethanbondingpairs • Doublebondstakeupmorespacethanasinglebonds • ImportantNote:Whendealingwithresonancestructures,theamountof spacethe“rotating”doublen=bondtakesupisnegligiblebecauseitis technicallyalldoublebonds ▯ • ElectronGeometry:TriganolBipyramidal • ℎ:Linearduetothe180degreeangle HowdowedothebondanglesforthismoleculeByusingtheideathatdouble bondstakeupmorespacethanasingle,andlonepairstakemorespacethanbonds • OctahedralElectronGeometry: ▯ ▯ • Molecularshape:squareplanar,duetothe90degreeangle • BondanglesforF-Xe-Fis90degrees • ElectronGeometry:Tetrahedral • MolecularShape:Triganolpyramidal • BondAnglesforH-N-Hislessthan109.5becausethelonepairwillmakethe anglesmallerthanthatofanormaltetrahedralmolecule NoticehowitisTetrahedralwiththelonepair,fortheshapethelonepairisnot drawn PolarandNon-PolarMolecules • Somethingispolarifithasanegativesideandanonpolarside • Inmoleculesthisisdeterminedbysymmetryaroundthecentralatom • If a molecule is symmetric (by polar bonds)around the central atom, the charges cancel eachother out • If the molecule is not semetric(by polar bonds) than the molecule is polar • A numeric measure of polarity is the Dipole moment(μ) • The more polar a molecule the larger the dipole moment • Is ▯ polar or non-polar Non-polar • Is ▯polar or non polar Non polar • Is ▯olar or non polar Polar • Look at the bonds and the way the bonds are arranged to see if they are polar or not! ValenceBondTheory • Acovalentbondisproducedbytheoverlapoforbitalsintheregion betweenthetwoatoms • Thegreatertheoverlap,thestrongerthebond. • But,theatomicorbitalsdonotalwayspointintherightdirectionsto producetheshapesthatthemoleculesaresupposedtohave Toexplainthis,itisassumedthattheatomicorbitalsaremixedtoproduce‘hybrid’ orbitalsthatpointinthecorrectdirection. • Hybridorbitalsarenamedfortheorbitalsthatcontributetothem.For Example isacombinationofonesorbitalandtwoporbitals • ImportantNote:Allorbitalsthataremixedmustcomefromthesame shell.ForExample3pand3scanbehybrids,but2pand4scannotbe combinedtogether. • The▯totalnumberoforbitalsisunchanged(Therewillbe2orbitals,three orbitalsandsoon) EachhybridhasitsownGeometryassociatedwithit,asshownbelow NoticehowforthegroundstateofCarbonthe2sorbitalisfull,butthe2porbitalis not▯evenhalffull,thismakescarbonunstablesothetwoorbitalscombinetoform ,makingcarbonstable • Singlebondsareformedbyoverlappingorbitalsinbetweenthe atoms.Thesebondsarecalledsigma(σ)bonds. • Doubleandtriplebondsalsocontainaσ-bondbutthesecond(andthird bond)cannotformdirectlybetweentheatoms(becausethereisalreadya pairofelectronsthere) • Theadditionalbondsareformedbyunhybridizedp-orbitalsthat overlapintheareastoeithersideofthesigmabond.Thesebondsare calledpi(π)bonds. • Adoublebondconsistsofaσ-bondandaπ-bond. • Atriplebondconsistsofaσ-bondandtwoπ-bonds. ThisDiagramshouldhelpyouvisualizetheprincipalofsigmaandpibonds

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Chapter 14, Problem 28E is Solved
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Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 13
Author: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus
ISBN: 9780321910417

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Solved: Rate Laws (Section)Consider a hypothetical