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Solved: Consider a grey squirrel falling out of a tree to

College Physics | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9781938168000 | Authors: Paul Peter Urone, Roger Hinrichs ISBN: 9781938168000 42

Solution for problem 35PE Chapter 2

College Physics | 1st Edition

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College Physics | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9781938168000 | Authors: Paul Peter Urone, Roger Hinrichs

College Physics | 1st Edition

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Problem 35PE

Consider a grey squirrel falling out of a tree to the ground. (a) If we ignore air resistance in this case (only for the sake of this problem), determine a squirrel’s velocity just before hitting the ground, assuming it fell from a height of 3.0 m. (b) If the squirrel stops in a distance of 2.0 cm through bending its limbs, compare its deceleration with that of the airman in the previous problem.

In World War II, there were several reported cases of airmen who jumped from their flaming airplanes with no parachute to escape certain death. Some fell about 20,000 feet (6000 m), and some of them survived, with few life threatening injuries. For these lucky pilots, the tree branches and snow drifts on the ground allowed their deceleration to be relatively small. If we assume that a pilot’s speed upon impact was 123 mph (54 m/s), then what was his deceleration? Assume that the trees and snow stopped him over a distance of 3.0 m.

Step-by-Step Solution:
Step 1 of 3<p>The first problem is free fall problem, calculate the final velocity for the squirrel for falling from 3.0 m height under the gravity.

In the second problem, the initial velocity is given, the stopping distance is given, calculate the deceleration and compare this with the airman jumping from the airplanes and surviving due to tree branch and snow.

Part (a) Step 2 of 3<p>The final velocity of the freely falling body is given by

Where  is the initial velocity,  is the acceleration due to gravity and  is the height from where it is falling.

Now the given values are

So the final velocity is

Hence, the velocity of the squirrel, just before hitting the ground, is 59 m/s.

Part (b)
Step 3 of 3

Chapter 2, Problem 35PE is Solved
Textbook: College Physics
Edition: 1
Author: Paul Peter Urone, Roger Hinrichs
ISBN: 9781938168000

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