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For what values of p does 1 _ 1 x -p dx converge

Calculus: Early Transcendentals | 2nd Edition | ISBN: 9780321947345 | Authors: William L. Briggs ISBN: 9780321947345 167

Solution for problem 4 Chapter 7.8

Calculus: Early Transcendentals | 2nd Edition

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Calculus: Early Transcendentals | 2nd Edition | ISBN: 9780321947345 | Authors: William L. Briggs

Calculus: Early Transcendentals | 2nd Edition

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Problem 4

For what values of p does 1 _ 1 x -p dx converge?

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NORTHCENTRAL UNIVERSITY ASSIGNMENT COVER SHEET Student: THIS FORM MUST BE COMPLETELY FILLED IN Follow these procedures: If requested by your instructor, please include an assignment cover sheet. This will become the first page of your assignment. In addition, your assignment header should include your last name, first initial, course code, dash, and assignment number. This should be left justified, with the page number right justified. For example: Save a copy of your assignments: You may need to re­submit an assignment at your instructor’s request. Make sure you save your files in accessible location. Academic integrity: All work submitted in each course must be your own original work. This includes all assignments, exams, term papers, and other projects required by your instructor. Knowingly submitting another person’s work as your own, without properly citing the source of the work, is considered plagiarism. This will result in an unsatisfactory grade for the work submitted or for the entire course. It may also result in academic dismissal from the University. IB7013­8­2 Gisela Salas, PhD Global Marketing Environment Assignment 2 Faculty Use Only 2 Introduction The purpose of this week’s assignment is to evaluate geographical challenges in global marketing inclusive of location, product type, and distributions channels. When launching a product globally there are certainly differences between those companies that are successful and those that are unsuccessful. As a researcher begins to conduct an analysis of the global environment, conclusions can be drawn on which are the most effective international marketing strategies. These strategies need to take into consideration not only the physical geographic factors, but the cultural perspectives within each of those regions. By identifying geographic perspective and trade patterns, a marketing strategy and strategic global launch plan can be developed. In order develop a successful marketing strategy there must be in depth research to review those companies that have previously attempted this type of venture and did well. In addition to this discussion there are several additional items that will be addressed within the following paper to include: 1) geography and product distribution, 2) location and place, and 3) international marketing impacts. Geography and Product Distribution The definition of geography has expanded beyond it’s practical description of a physical location. The idea that geographical perspective is now even more vital to understand as businesses compete in the global market. Czinkota and Ronkainen (2013) discussed that geographic perspective takes in factors to evaluate geographic patterns for purchasing products and allows the potential for estimating change in consumer purchasing. Take into consideration an example of healthy eating and fitness trends and how those trends spread throughout the regions of the U.S. As marketers implement products, they can have insight on how a particular 3 product will do within a given region. If a company were to introduce a product that is based upon drinking green shakes and eating meals made of tofu, a marketer could immediately see that the product would do much better in California than it would in let’s say, Alabama. It’s not to say that people in Alabama wouldn’t eat and drink the new product, but the geographic perspective in the deep south is skewed to a high fat, high cholesterol diet. This same type of concept could also be applied to selling that same product within Ethiopia compared to selling in Iceland. A large percentage of the population in Ethiopia is poverty stricken and the least of their worries is which type of tofu should they buy. Residents are more concerned with where they are going to get their next meal, than where to process their shake. Iceland residents tend to have a much higher income and standard of living which leads to the consumption of different types of food. Iceland residents have a significant population of personnel utilizing the gym and focusing on being health conscious which also leads to a new way of eating. With these geographical factors taken into account, a marketer would certainly push the product to Iceland over Ethiopia. Another very important area to consider in addition to geography is the distribution channel. As distribution channels are considered, one must consider how difficult it is to get a product into a particular region or country. A personal example of this endeavor was during my deployed time in Iraq. In order to successfully distribute a product, distribution channels had to be identified early on. To transport products into Iraq from other countries is an extremely difficult task. The logistical efforts it took to bring in even the simplest of products into the country required shipments from other countries utilizing ships and aircraft taking months to acquire. If the products were transported by sea, the delivery dates could be pushed back by a 4 year or more. Once the product made it into Middle East, the products would be transported by truck to the military base, and once again the process required additional extensive logistical efforts. Even with the correct paperwork and an identified distribution channels, getting products into this country was on some days impossible. In this instance a new business could certainly evaluate the possibility of establishing a manufacturing plant in Iraq itself and develop a new distribution channel. Location and Place The terms location and place may seem as if they are interchangeable, but they are more different than meets the eye. Location has an overall definition of a geographical point on a map. Place, as Czinkota and Ronkainen (2013) defined, is not only the location but both natural and human characteristics of that location. Things tend to relate to one another at a specific place by their given characteristics. In India, curry is a popular type of food seasoning. As a marketer focuses on India, they could create products such as chicken curry, pork curry, and lamb curry and be relatively certain that another curry product would be successful. If that same marketer took into consideration natural and human features he/she would need to understand how people relate or perceive a product. If a beef curry product was incorporated into this same area, this product has a high probability of failure. A little known fact is that people in India tend to believe that cow are sacred and are not eaten. In this instance, the marketer would either not market to India or they would only market to niche groups that live within India’s borders. Not only is the product type important to the location and place it is marketed to, but so is the type of marketing strategy for that place and location. Gabrielsson, Gabrielsson, and Seppäl 5 (2012) discussed the effectiveness of a standard marketing strategy and how it compared to that of an adaptive strategy. One strategy may work well in a certain area while another fails miserably. While the standard marketing strategy has its positive points especially the benefit of utilizing economies of scale, there is certainly a need and advantage to utilizing an adaptive strategy. This concept is a basically goes to show that all people are not the same and while we as a race are similar in nature, the environment certainly has a significant impact on the way each country views a product. Hollis (2011) further discussed how global marketers must develop branding that will be accepted and appeal to consumers worldwide. Once the product is identified, only then should the marketing plan and communication with the global market move forward. International Marketing Impacts As the discussion is moves further, a marketer must understand how interaction, movement, and region play a role within international marketing. According to Czinkota and Ronkainen (2013) interaction takes place when the characteristics of several places are the same, while the overall culture may be different. As long as the same set of characteristics and/or beliefs are present, the product should be successful in each of the markets. A marketer must find these similarities and utilize them to his/her advantage. Once these areas are identified, a marketer should then market to each of the associated markets by using a similar strategy. By viewing each area as the same, processes are consolidated and a marketer can move away from remaking the wheel. Movement takes on a different aspect than interaction. While interaction focuses on identifying similar characteristics of a place and marketing a product to the identified locations, 6 movement is the opposite. Movement focuses on how places that do not have the same characteristics and their relation to one another. While the places may be different, the challenge of the marketer is to find where the connections lie in the research. As an example of how this process is used, location X is different from location Y in a variety of ways. While in location X the company must have 5 commercial ovens to maintain the business. In location Y, commercial ovens are not an immediate option, but brick ovens will do a good enough job. By first identifying the differences in the locations, finding the relatable areas and subsequently developing another way to do the same job, success can be found until the ovens can be shipped in. Being able to transport the needed items into the area is extremely important in developing business in new, differing, and unrelated areas. Region refers to an overall set of places sharing certain characteristics. When the set of characteristics of that certain area are defined marketing becomes easier. An example of a region could be tornado alley. Tornado alley extends specifically from northern Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska. A marketing plan could include building shelters all along this area for the protection from tornados. While they may form throughout the U.S., this area dominates in the volume of tornados. This discussion can be taken a bit further. Omura, Todorova, and Chung (2015) developed the discussion on how storage and holding inventory in a region affects the overall pricing of a durable goods. This example certainly applies to crude oil within a given region. The larger the number of barrels of crude oil begin produced and stored in a particular region allows for a reduction in gas prices and vice versa. The U.S. showed this to be true by importing and allowing use of a significant increase of crude oil, and the gas prices dropped by over a 7 dollar within in the last few years. Robb, Liu, Lai, and Ren (2012) take this discussion to the international market. By analyzing the affects of inventory held within the regions of China. By scaling not only inventory, but the size of stores, and the frequency of store locations, a company will certainly benefit. If there is too much inventory or too many stores, the market will be flooded and prices will be diminished. The opposite is true of too little inventory or too few stores. The pricing will be increased until a competitor comes in and establishes their own location. The idea is to find the correct balance between all factors. Conclusion The purpose of this week’s assignment was to evaluate geographical challenges in global marketing. When launching a product globally there are certainly differences between those companies that are successful and those that are not unsuccessful. As a researcher begins to conduct an analysis of the global environment, conclusions can be drawn on the most effective international marketing strategies. These strategies need to take into consideration not only the physical geographic factors, but the culture and perspectives within each of those regions. By identifying geographic perspective and trade patterns, a marketing strategy and strategic global launch plan can be developed. In order develop a successful marketing strategy there must be in depth research to review those companies that have previously attempted this type of venture. In addition to this discussion there are several additional items that will be addressed within the following paper to include: 1) geography and product distribution, 2) location and place, and 3) international marketing impacts. 8 9 References Czinkota, M. R., & Ronkainen, I. A. (2013) International Marketing. Mason: South­Western Gabrielsson, P., Gabrielsson, M., & Seppäl, T. (2012). Marketing strategies for foreign expansion of companies originating in small and open economies: The consequences of strategic fit and performance. Journal of International Marketing, 20(2), 25­48. doi:10.1509/jim.11.0068 Hollis, N. (2011). Globalization in context. Journal of Advertising Research, 5137­41. Retrieved from http://www.journalofadvertisingresearch.com Omura, A., Todorova, N., Li, B., & Chung, R. (2015). Convenience yield and inventory accessibility: Impact of regional market conditions. Resources Policy, 441­11. doi:10.1016/j.resourpol.2014.12.002 Robb, D. J., Liu, F., Lai, R., & Ren, Z. J. (2012). Inventory in mainland China: Historical, industry, and geographic perspectives. International Journal of Production Economics, 135(Advances in Optimization and Design of Supply Chains), 440­450. doi:10.1016/j.ijpe.2011.08.020 NORTHCENTRAL UNIVERSITY ASSIGNMENT COVER SHEET Student: THIS FORM MUST BE COMPLETELY FILLED IN Follow these procedures: If requested by your instructor, please include an assignment cover sheet. This will become the first page of your assignment. In addition, your assignment header should include your last name, first initial, course code, dash, and assignment number. This should be left justified, with the page number right justified. For example: Save a copy of your assignments: You may need to re­submit an assignment at your instructor’s request. Make sure you save your files in accessible location. Academic integrity: All work submitted in each course must be your own original work. This includes all assignments, exams, term papers, and other projects required by your instructor. Knowingly submitting another person’s work as your own, without properly citing the source of the work, is considered plagiarism. This will result in an unsatisfactory grade for the work submitted or for the entire course. It may also result in academic dismissal from the University. IB7013­8­2 Gisela Salas, PhD Global Marketing Environment Assignment 2 Faculty Use Only 2 Introduction The purpose of this week’s assignment is to evaluate geographical challenges in global marketing inclusive of location, product type, and distributions channels. When launching a product globally there are certainly differences between those companies that are successful and those that are unsuccessful. As a researcher begins to conduct an analysis of the global environment, conclusions can be drawn on which are the most effective international marketing strategies. These strategies need to take into consideration not only the physical geographic factors, but the cultural perspectives within each of those regions. By identifying geographic perspective and trade patterns, a marketing strategy and strategic global launch plan can be developed. In order develop a successful marketing strategy there must be in depth research to review those companies that have previously attempted this type of venture and did well. In addition to this discussion there are several additional items that will be addressed within the following paper to include: 1) geography and product distribution, 2) location and place, and 3) international marketing impacts. Geography and Product Distribution The definition of geography has expanded beyond it’s practical description of a physical location. The idea that geographical perspective is now even more vital to understand as businesses compete in the global market. Czinkota and Ronkainen (2013) discussed that geographic perspective takes in factors to evaluate geographic patterns for purchasing products and allows the potential for estimating change in consumer purchasing. Take into consideration an example of healthy eating and fitness trends and how those trends spread throughout the regions of the U.S. As marketers implement products, they can have insight on how a particular 3 product will do within a given region. If a company were to introduce a product that is based upon drinking green shakes and eating meals made of tofu, a marketer could immediately see that the product would do much better in California than it would in let’s say, Alabama. It’s not to say that people in Alabama wouldn’t eat and drink the new product, but the geographic perspective in the deep south is skewed to a high fat, high cholesterol diet. This same type of concept could also be applied to selling that same product within Ethiopia compared to selling in Iceland. A large percentage of the population in Ethiopia is poverty stricken and the least of their worries is which type of tofu should they buy. Residents are more concerned with where they are going to get their next meal, than where to process their shake. Iceland residents tend to have a much higher income and standard of living which leads to the consumption of different types of food. Iceland residents have a significant population of personnel utilizing the gym and focusing on being health conscious which also leads to a new way of eating. With these geographical factors taken into account, a marketer would certainly push the product to Iceland over Ethiopia. Another very important area to consider in addition to geography is the distribution channel. As distribution channels are considered, one must consider how difficult it is to get a product into a particular region or country. A personal example of this endeavor was during my deployed time in Iraq. In order to successfully distribute a product, distribution channels had to be identified early on. To transport products into Iraq from other countries is an extremely difficult task. The logistical efforts it took to bring in even the simplest of products into the country required shipments from other countries utilizing ships and aircraft taking months to acquire. If the products were transported by sea, the delivery dates could be pushed back by a 4 year or more. Once the product made it into Middle East, the products would be transported by truck to the military base, and once again the process required additional extensive logistical efforts. Even with the correct paperwork and an identified distribution channels, getting products into this country was on some days impossible. In this instance a new business could certainly evaluate the possibility of establishing a manufacturing plant in Iraq itself and develop a new distribution channel. Location and Place The terms location and place may seem as if they are interchangeable, but they are more different than meets the eye. Location has an overall definition of a geographical point on a map. Place, as Czinkota and Ronkainen (2013) defined, is not only the location but both natural and human characteristics of that location. Things tend to relate to one another at a specific place by their given characteristics. In India, curry is a popular type of food seasoning. As a marketer focuses on India, they could create products such as chicken curry, pork curry, and lamb curry and be relatively certain that another curry product would be successful. If that same marketer took into consideration natural and human features he/she would need to understand how people relate or perceive a product. If a beef curry product was incorporated into this same area, this product has a high probability of failure. A little known fact is that people in India tend to believe that cow are sacred and are not eaten. In this instance, the marketer would either not market to India or they would only market to niche groups that live within India’s borders. Not only is the product type important to the location and place it is marketed to, but so is the type of marketing strategy for that place and location. Gabrielsson, Gabrielsson, and Seppäl 5 (2012) discussed the effectiveness of a standard marketing strategy and how it compared to that of an adaptive strategy. One strategy may work well in a certain area while another fails miserably. While the standard marketing strategy has its positive points especially the benefit of utilizing economies of scale, there is certainly a need and advantage to utilizing an adaptive strategy. This concept is a basically goes to show that all people are not the same and while we as a race are similar in nature, the environment certainly has a significant impact on the way each country views a product. Hollis (2011) further discussed how global marketers must develop branding that will be accepted and appeal to consumers worldwide. Once the product is identified, only then should the marketing plan and communication with the global market move forward. International Marketing Impacts As the discussion is moves further, a marketer must understand how interaction, movement, and region play a role within international marketing. According to Czinkota and Ronkainen (2013) interaction takes place when the characteristics of several places are the same, while the overall culture may be different. As long as the same set of characteristics and/or beliefs are present, the product should be successful in each of the markets. A marketer must find these similarities and utilize them to his/her advantage. Once these areas are identified, a marketer should then market to each of the associated markets by using a similar strategy. By viewing each area as the same, processes are consolidated and a marketer can move away from remaking the wheel. Movement takes on a different aspect than interaction. While interaction focuses on identifying similar characteristics of a place and marketing a product to the identified locations, 6 movement is the opposite. Movement focuses on how places that do not have the same characteristics and their relation to one another. While the places may be different, the challenge of the marketer is to find where the connections lie in the research. As an example of how this process is used, location X is different from location Y in a variety of ways. While in location X the company must have 5 commercial ovens to maintain the business. In location Y, commercial ovens are not an immediate option, but brick ovens will do a good enough job. By first identifying the differences in the locations, finding the relatable areas and subsequently developing another way to do the same job, success can be found until the ovens can be shipped in. Being able to transport the needed items into the area is extremely important in developing business in new, differing, and unrelated areas. Region refers to an overall set of places sharing certain characteristics. When the set of characteristics of that certain area are defined marketing becomes easier. An example of a region could be tornado alley. Tornado alley extends specifically from northern Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska. A marketing plan could include building shelters all along this area for the protection from tornados. While they may form throughout the U.S., this area dominates in the volume of tornados. This discussion can be taken a bit further. Omura, Todorova, and Chung (2015) developed the discussion on how storage and holding inventory in a region affects the overall pricing of a durable goods. This example certainly applies to crude oil within a given region. The larger the number of barrels of crude oil begin produced and stored in a particular region allows for a reduction in gas prices and vice versa. The U.S. showed this to be true by importing and allowing use of a significant increase of crude oil, and the gas prices dropped by over a 7 dollar within in the last few years. Robb, Liu, Lai, and Ren (2012) take this discussion to the international market. By analyzing the affects of inventory held within the regions of China. By scaling not only inventory, but the size of stores, and the frequency of store locations, a company will certainly benefit. If there is too much inventory or too many stores, the market will be flooded and prices will be diminished. The opposite is true of too little inventory or too few stores. The pricing will be increased until a competitor comes in and establishes their own location. The idea is to find the correct balance between all factors. Conclusion The purpose of this week’s assignment was to evaluate geographical challenges in global marketing. When launching a product globally there are certainly differences between those companies that are successful and those that are not unsuccessful. As a researcher begins to conduct an analysis of the global environment, conclusions can be drawn on the most effective international marketing strategies. These strategies need to take into consideration not only the physical geographic factors, but the culture and perspectives within each of those regions. By identifying geographic perspective and trade patterns, a marketing strategy and strategic global launch plan can be developed. In order develop a successful marketing strategy there must be in depth research to review those companies that have previously attempted this type of venture. In addition to this discussion there are several additional items that will be addressed within the following paper to include: 1) geography and product distribution, 2) location and place, and 3) international marketing impacts. 8 9 References Czinkota, M. R., & Ronkainen, I. A. (2013) International Marketing. Mason: South­Western Gabrielsson, P., Gabrielsson, M., & Seppäl, T. (2012). Marketing strategies for foreign expansion of companies originating in small and open economies: The consequences of strategic fit and performance. Journal of International Marketing, 20(2), 25­48. doi:10.1509/jim.11.0068 Hollis, N. (2011). Globalization in context. Journal of Advertising Research, 5137­41. Retrieved from http://www.journalofadvertisingresearch.com Omura, A., Todorova, N., Li, B., & Chung, R. (2015). Convenience yield and inventory accessibility: Impact of regional market conditions. Resources Policy, 441­11. doi:10.1016/j.resourpol.2014.12.002 Robb, D. J., Liu, F., Lai, R., & Ren, Z. J. (2012). Inventory in mainland China: Historical, industry, and geographic perspectives. International Journal of Production Economics, 135(Advances in Optimization and Design of Supply Chains), 440­450. doi:10.1016/j.ijpe.2011.08.020

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Textbook: Calculus: Early Transcendentals
Edition: 2
Author: William L. Briggs
ISBN: 9780321947345

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Calculus: Early Transcendentals, edition: 2. Since the solution to 4 from 7.8 chapter was answered, more than 240 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. The answer to “For what values of p does 1 _ 1 x -p dx converge?” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 13 words. This full solution covers the following key subjects: . This expansive textbook survival guide covers 128 chapters, and 9720 solutions. Calculus: Early Transcendentals was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321947345. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 4 from chapter: 7.8 was answered by , our top Calculus solution expert on 12/23/17, 04:24PM.

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For what values of p does 1 _ 1 x -p dx converge