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A bar magnet is often modeled as a magnetic dipole with

Fundamentals of Differential Equations | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780321747730 | Authors: R. Kent Nagle, Edward B. Saff, Arthur David Snider ISBN: 9780321747730 43

Solution for problem 20E Chapter 1.3

Fundamentals of Differential Equations | 8th Edition

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Fundamentals of Differential Equations | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780321747730 | Authors: R. Kent Nagle, Edward B. Saff, Arthur David Snider

Fundamentals of Differential Equations | 8th Edition

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Problem 20E

Problem

A bar magnet is often modeled as a magnetic dipole with one end labeled the north pole N and the opposite end labeled the south pole S. The magnetic field for the magnetic dipole is symmetric with respect to rotation about the axis passing lengthwise through the center of the bar. Hence we can study the magnetic field by restricting ourselves to a plane with the bar magnet centered on the x-axis. For a point P that is located a distance r from the origin, where r is much greater than the length of the magnet, the magnetic field lines satisfy the differential

Equation

and the equipotential lines satisfy the equation

(a) Show that the two families of curves are perpendicular where they intersect. [Hint: Consider the slopes of the tangent lines of the two curves at a point of intersection.]

(b) Sketch the direction field for equation (4) for  You can use a software package to generate the direction field or use the method of isoclines. The direction field should remind you of the experiment where iron filings are sprinkled on a sheet of paper that is held above a bar magnet. The iron filings correspond to the hash marks.

(c) Use the direction field found in part (b) to help sketch the magnetic field lines that are solutions to (4).

(d) Apply the statement of part (a) to the curves in part (c) to sketch the equipotential lines that are solutions to (5). The magnetic field lines and the equipotential lines are examples of orthogonal trajectories. (See Problem 32 in Exercises 2.4, pages 62–63.)†

Step-by-Step Solution:

Step 1:

Given equations are:

Step 2:

a).

Multiply both the equations:

Since, the result of the inclined of the two bends is equivalent to (- 1), the lines are perpendicular to the point of convergence.

Step 3:

The direction field for

b). Plot the graph for  

Step 4 of 5

Chapter 1.3, Problem 20E is Solved
Step 5 of 5

Textbook: Fundamentals of Differential Equations
Edition: 8
Author: R. Kent Nagle, Edward B. Saff, Arthur David Snider
ISBN: 9780321747730

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Fundamentals of Differential Equations , edition: 8. Fundamentals of Differential Equations was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321747730. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 20E from chapter: 1.3 was answered by , our top Calculus solution expert on 07/11/17, 04:37AM. Since the solution to 20E from 1.3 chapter was answered, more than 287 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. The answer to “A bar magnet is often modeled as a magnetic dipole with one end labeled the north pole N and the opposite end labeled the south pole S. The magnetic field for the magnetic dipole is symmetric with respect to rotation about the axis passing lengthwise through the center of the bar. Hence we can study the magnetic field by restricting ourselves to a plane with the bar magnet centered on the x-axis. For a point P that is located a distance r from the origin, where r is much greater than the length of the magnet, the magnetic field lines satisfy the differentialEquation and the equipotential lines satisfy the equation (a) Show that the two families of curves are perpendicular where they intersect. [Hint: Consider the slopes of the tangent lines of the two curves at a point of intersection.](b) Sketch the direction field for equation (4) for You can use a software package to generate the direction field or use the method of isoclines. The direction field should remind you of the experiment where iron filings are sprinkled on a sheet of paper that is held above a bar magnet. The iron filings correspond to the hash marks.(c) Use the direction field found in part (b) to help sketch the magnetic field lines that are solutions to (4).(d) Apply the statement of part (a) to the curves in part (c) to sketch the equipotential lines that are solutions to (5). The magnetic field lines and the equipotential lines are examples of orthogonal trajectories. (See in Exercises 2.4, pages 62–63.)†” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 260 words. This full solution covers the following key subjects: Field, magnetic, Lines, direction, bar. This expansive textbook survival guide covers 67 chapters, and 2118 solutions.

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