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A substance in which the valence and conduction bands

General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications | 10th Edition | ISBN: 9780132064521 | Authors: Ralph Petrucci ISBN: 9780132064521 175

Solution for problem 98 Chapter 11

General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications | 10th Edition

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General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications | 10th Edition | ISBN: 9780132064521 | Authors: Ralph Petrucci

General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications | 10th Edition

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Problem 98

A substance in which the valence and conduction bands overlap is (a) a semiconductor; (b) a metalloid; (c) a metal; (d) an insulator. Br2(l); CO3 CH 2-. HS 4; -; H2; sp3; sp3d; sp3d2. XeF2 sp; H2 -H2 Li2; He2; . +; NO3 H2Se. -; I3 PCl3; -; H2S, 90; 90. 109 120; H2S; H2Se N2; SO2; He2. PCl5; sp2 s p C6H6; s-bond s p sp 2*p 2;

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CONSUMER BEHAVIOR EXAM 2 REVIEW (CHAPTERS 7-11) I. CHAPTER 7 – ATTITUDE A. attitude- relatively enduring overall evaluations of objects, products, services, issues or people; general feeling B. Functional Theory of Attitudes 1. 4 Functions: 1) utilitarian function- attitudes to obtain rewards/ avoid punishment 2) knowledge function- simplify decision processes 3) value-expression function- expression of core values 4) ego-defensive function- defense mechanism to defend low self-concept C. 3 Components of Attitudes: a) AFFECT – feelings about an object b) BEHAVIOR c) COGNITION – thoughts/beliefs about an object 1 HIERARCHY OF EFFECTS d) high involvement – C, A, B – think, feel, act e) low involvement – C, B, A – think, act, feel f) experiential involvement – A, B, C – feel, act, think g) behavioral influence – B, C, A – act, think, feel D. Multiattribute Model - overall evaluation from combined attitudes E. Attitude Towards Objects (ATO Model) - attitudes are made up of attitudes from all attributes - Ao= Σ(b i(e i - A= overall attitude / Σ= sum of all b(e)’s / b= beliefs about an attribute / e= evaluation of attributes 1. beliefs – VARY across brands 2. evaluations – do NOT VARY across brands F. Compensatory Model - decisions are compensatory or non-compensatory - high ratings on one attribute can makeup for low ratings on another o it “compensates” for the bad o ATO model is compensatory G. Attitude Behavior Consistency H. relationship between an attitude toward an object and the behavior towards that object (FIG 7.4) I. Change in Attitudes: 4 Theories 1. ATO Model - changes in beliefs/evaluations can affect our attitude - positives and negatives of an attritube 2. Balance Theory - people want to be consistent in their thoughts (FIG 7.6) 3. Elaboration Likelihood Model - consumers process messages in 2 ways: o CENTRAL ROUTE – highly involved; really care about message o PERIPHERAL ROUTE – low involvement; don’t really care - 2 cues IN the message: o CENTRAL cues – info about the quality of the product o PERIPHERAL cues – info UNRELATED to the product 4. Social Judgment Theory (FIG 7.7) II. CHAPTER 8 – GROUP & INTERPERSONAL INFLUENCE A. group influence- the ways group members influence attitudes B. CHARACTERISTICS OF A GROUP: - share common goals/interests - communicate with and influence one another - view themselves as members of common social unit - IN group defined by NOT being OUT group C. group types: PRIMARY, SECONDARY, ASPIRATIONAL, DISSOCIATIVE D. aspirational groups- group in which one desires to become a member dissociative groups- group in which one does NOT want to belong E. social power- ability of individual/group to influence the actions of others 1. referent power 2. legitimate power 3. expert power 4. reward power 5. coercive power F. Group Influence on PRODUCT SELECTION (FIG 8.2) - product necessity VS. consumption setting - public necessity, public luxury, private necessity, private luxury G. Word of Mouth (WOM) - positive or negative - fake WOM (ex: paid/phony reviews) - amplified WOM (ex: being sent free products to share about) - influence of social media III. CHAPTER 9 – CONSUMER CULTURE A. what does culture do - gives meaning to objects - gives meaning to activities - facilitates communication B. cultural norms- rules that specify what is or is NOT appropriate behavior in a situation within a given culture C. Dimensions of Cultural Values 1. Core Societal Values (CSV) – (TABLE 9.4) - individualism – value self, personal achievement o OPPOSITE: collectivistic culture - masculinity – value assertiveness and control o OPPOSITE: feminine culture - power distance – emphasize social status (high power) o OPPOSITE: low power distance - uncertainty avoidance – uncomfortable with unknown and high risk o OPPOSITE: low uncertainty avoidance - long term orientation – o OPPOSITE: short term orientation D. glocalization – idea that market strategy may be global but the implementation of that strategy at the marketing tactics level should be local (ex: McDonald’s menu varies from country to country/culture to culture) IV. CHAPTER 10 – MICROCULTURES A. microcultures – group of people who share similar values and tastes that are subsumed within a larger culture 1. role conflict- consumer experience conflicting expectations based on cultural expectations 2. divergence- consumers choose membership in microcultures in order to stand out or define themselves B. FACTORS OF MICROCULTURES: 1. geography 2. age/generations a) cohort- group of people who have lived the same major experiences, which end up shaping their core values - Greatest Gen: before 1928 – hard work, self sacrifice, conformity - Silent Gen: 1928-45 – civic duty, strong faith in gov’t, frugal - Baby Boomers: 1945-65 – suburbia, self absorbed, stressed - Gen X: 1965-80 – latch key kids, cynicism, practical - Millennials: 1980-95 – embrace technology, optimism, econ. hardships - Gen Z: 1995-2013 – social media, technology, accepting diversity V. CHAPTER 11 – CONSUMERS IN SITUATIONS A. Time 1. Time pressure- causes the use of HEURISTICS- mental shortcuts 2. Time of day a) circadian cycle- daily energy cycle based on sleeping and waking times 3. Time of year a) advertiming- places ads/promotion strategically at certain times of the day/year B. Construal Level Theory 1. proximal event- will happen soon; viewed concretely 2. distal event- won’t happen for a long time; viewed discretely (ex: volunteering 3 mo. from now VS. the day before C. Atmospherics 1. fit- how appropriate the elements are to the environment 2. congruity- consistency of elements with each other 3. ELEMENTS: a) odor - olfactory b) music – fast vs. slow; secular vs. religious c) color – cool vs. warm d) merchandising – signage, placement e) social setting – crowdage (nonlinear effect) D. Types of Shopping 1. acquisitional – oriented toward a specific, intended purchase 2. epistemic – acquiring knowledge about a product 3. experiential 4. impulsiveness – spontaneous; diminished regard for consequences - self regulation- inhibiting situational influences from interfering with intentions o action oriented VS state oriented E. IMPULSIVE vs UNPLANNED vs COMPULSIVE 1. impulsive- spontaneous; hedonic; self- fulfillment 2. unplanned- spontaneous; utilitarian 3. compulsive- compulsive buying disorder; harmful/uncontrollable; chronic depression CONSUMER BEHAVIOR EXAM 2 REVIEW (CHAPTERS 7-­‐11) I. CHAPTER 7 – ATTITUDE A. attitude-­‐ relatively enduring overall evaluations of objects, products, services, issues or people; general feeling B. Functional Theory of Attitudes 1. 4 Functions: 1) utilitarian function-­‐ attitudes to obtain rewards/ avoid punishment 2) knowledge function-­‐ simplify decision processes 3) value-­‐expression function-­‐ expression of core values 4) ego-­‐defensive function-­‐ defense mechanism to defend low self-­‐ concept C. 3 Components of Attitudes: a) AFFECT – feelings about an object b) BEHAVIOR c) COGNITION – thoughts/beliefs about an object 1. HIERARCHY OF EFFECTS a) high involvement – C, A, B – think, feel, act b) low involvement – C, B, A – think, act, feel c) experiential involvement – A, B, C – feel, act, think d) behavioral influence – B, C, A – act, think, feel D. Multiattribute Model -­‐ overall evaluation from combined attitudes E. Attitude Towards Objects (ATO Model) -­‐ attitudes are made up of attitudes from all attributes -­‐ Ao= Σ(bi)(e i -­‐ A= overall attitude / Σ= sum of all b(e)’s / b= beliefs about an attribute / e= evaluation of attributes 1. beliefs – VARY across brands 2. evaluations – do NOT VARY across brands F. Compensatory Model -­‐ decisions are compensatory or non-­‐compensatory -­‐ high ratings on one attribute can makeup for low ratings on another o it “compensates” for the bad o ATO model is compensatory G. Attitude Behavior Consistency H. relationship between an attitude toward an object and the behavior towards that object (FIG 7.4) I. Change in Attitudes: 4 Theories 1. ATO Model -­‐ changes in beliefs/evaluations can affect our attitude -­‐ positives and negatives of an attritube 2. Balance Theory -­‐ people want to be consistent in their thoughts (FIG 7.6) 3. Elaboration Likelihood Model -­‐ consumers process messages in 2 ways: o CENTRAL ROUTE – highly involved; really care about message o PERIPHERAL ROUTE – low involvement; don’t really care -­‐ 2 cues IN the message: o CENTRAL cues – info about the quality of the product o PERIPHERAL cues – info UNRELATED to the product 4. Social Judgment Theory (FIG 7.7) II. CHAPTER 8 – GROUP & INTERPERSONAL INFLUENCE A. group influence-­‐ the ways group members influence attitudes B. CHARACTERISTICS OF A GROUP: -­‐ share common goals/interests -­‐ communicate with and influence one another -­‐ view themselves as members of common social unit -­‐ IN group defined by NOT being OUT group C. group types: PRIMARY, SECONDARY, ASPIRATIONAL, DISSOCIATIVE D. aspirational groups-­‐ group in which one desires to become a member dissociative groups-­‐ group in which one does NOT want to belong E. social power-­‐ ability of individual/group to influence the actions of others 1. referent power 2. legitimate power 3. expert power 4. reward power 5. coercive power F. Group Influence on PRODUCT SELECTION (FIG 8.2) -­‐ product necessity VS. consumption setting -­‐ public necessity, public luxury, private necessity, private luxury G. Word of Mouth (WOM) -­‐ positive or negative -­‐ fake WOM (ex: paid/phony reviews) -­‐ amplified WOM (ex: being sent free products to share about) -­‐ influence of social media III. CHAPTER 9 – CONSUMER CULTURE A. what does culture do -­‐ gives meaning to objects -­‐ gives meaning to activities -­‐ facilitates communication B. cultural norms-­‐ rules that specify what is or is NOT appropriate behavior in a situation within a given culture C. Dimensions of Cultural Values 1. Core Societal Values (CSV) – (TABLE 9.4) -­‐ individualism – value self, personal achievement o OPPOSITE: collectivistic culture -­‐ masculinity – value assertiveness and control o OPPOSITE: feminine culture -­‐ power distance – emphasize social status (high power) o OPPOSITE: low power distance -­‐ uncertainty avoidance – uncomfortable with unknown and high risk o OPPOSITE: low uncertainty avoidance -­‐ long term orientation – o OPPOSITE: short term orientation D. glocalization – idea that market strategy may be global but the implementation of that strategy at the marketing tactics level should be local (ex: McDonald’s menu varies from country to country/culture to culture) IV. CHAPTER 10 – MICROCULTURES A. microcultures – group of people who share similar values and tastes that are subsumed within a larger culture 1. role conflict-­‐ consumer experience conflicting expectations based on cultural expectations 2. divergence-­‐ consumers choose membership in microcultures in order to stand out or define themselves B. FACTORS OF MICROCULTURES: 1. geography 2. age/generations a) cohort-­‐ group of people who have lived the same major experiences, which end up shaping their core values -­‐ Greatest Gen: before 1928 – hard work, self sacrifice, conformity -­‐ Silent Gen: 1928-­‐45 – civic duty, strong faith in gov’t, frugal -­‐ Baby Boomers: 1945-­‐65 – suburbia, self absorbed, stressed -­‐ Gen X: 1965-­‐80 – latch key kids, cynicism, practical -­‐ Millennials: 1980-­‐95 – embrace technology, optimism, econ. hardships -­‐ Gen Z: 1995-­‐2013 – social media, technology, accepting diversity V. CHAPTER 11 – CONSUMERS IN SITUATIONS A. Time 1. Time pressure-­‐ causes the use of HEURISTICS-­‐ mental shortcuts 2. Time of day a) circadian cycle-­‐ daily energy cycle based on sleeping and waking times 3. Time of year a) advertiming-­‐ places ads/promotion strategically at certain times of the day/year B. Construal Level Theory 1. proximal event-­‐ will happen soon; viewed concretely 2. distal event-­‐ won’t happen for a long time; viewed discretely (ex: volunteering 3 mo. from now VS. the day before C. Atmospherics 1. fit-­‐ how appropriate the elements are to the environment 2. congruity-­‐ consistency of elements with each other 3. ELEMENTS: a) odor -­‐ olfactory b) music – fast vs. slow; secular vs. religious c) color – cool vs. warm d) merchandising – signage, placement e) social setting – crowdage (nonlinear effect) D. Types of Shopping 1. acquisitional – oriented toward a specific, intended purchase 2. epistemic – acquiring knowledge about a product 3. experiential 4. impulsiveness – spontaneous; diminished regard for consequences -­‐ self regulation-­‐ inhibiting situational influences from interfering with intentions o action oriented VS state oriented E. IMPULSIVE vs UNPLANNED vs COMPULSIVE 1. impulsive-­‐ spontaneous; hedonic; self-­‐fulfillment 2. unplanned-­‐ spontaneous; utilitarian 3. compulsive-­‐ compulsive buying disorder; harmful/uncontrollable; chronic depression

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Chapter 11, Problem 98 is Solved
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Textbook: General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications
Edition: 10
Author: Ralph Petrucci
ISBN: 9780132064521

Since the solution to 98 from 11 chapter was answered, more than 232 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. The answer to “A substance in which the valence and conduction bands overlap is (a) a semiconductor; (b) a metalloid; (c) a metal; (d) an insulator. Br2(l); CO3 CH 2-. HS 4; -; H2; sp3; sp3d; sp3d2. XeF2 sp; H2 -H2 Li2; He2; . +; NO3 H2Se. -; I3 PCl3; -; H2S, 90; 90. 109 120; H2S; H2Se N2; SO2; He2. PCl5; sp2 s p C6H6; s-bond s p sp 2*p 2;” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 69 words. General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780132064521. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 98 from chapter: 11 was answered by , our top Chemistry solution expert on 12/23/17, 04:52PM. This full solution covers the following key subjects: . This expansive textbook survival guide covers 28 chapters, and 3268 solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications, edition: 10.

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A substance in which the valence and conduction bands