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The electrical resistance R (in ohms) of a wire is

Explorations in College Algebra | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780470466445 | Authors: Linda Almgren Kime ISBN: 9780470466445 178

Solution for problem 2.8.4 Chapter 2

Explorations in College Algebra | 5th Edition

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Explorations in College Algebra | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780470466445 | Authors: Linda Almgren Kime

Explorations in College Algebra | 5th Edition

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Problem 2.8.4

The electrical resistance R (in ohms) of a wire is directly proportional to its length l (in feet). a. If 250 feet of wire has a resistance of 1.2 ohms, find the resistance for 150 ft of wire. b. Interpret the coefficient of l in this context

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NORTHCENTRAL UNIVERSITY ASSIGNMENT COVER SHEET Student: THIS FORM MUST BE COMPLETELY FILLED IN Follow these procedures: If requested by your instructor, please include an assignment cover sheet. This will become the first page of your assignment. In addition, your assignment header should include your last name, first initial, course code, dash, and assignment number. This should be left justified, with the page number right justified. For example: Save a copy of your assignments: You may need to re­submit an assignment at your instructor’s request. Make sure you save your files in accessible location. Academic integrity: All work submitted in each course must be your own original work. This includes all assignments, exams, term papers, and other projects required by your instructor. Knowingly submitting another person’s work as your own, without properly citing the source of the work, is considered plagiarism. This will result in an unsatisfactory grade for the work submitted or for the entire course. It may also result in academic dismissal from the University. BTM7103­8 John Halstead, PhD Research Design Assignment 6 Faculty Use Only 2 Introduction Developing a doctoral dissertation requires extensive research and an understanding on a wide variety of topics. Throughout the first half a student’s doctoral degree, foundation courses incorporating basic research methodologies and literature review are required. As each doctoral student enters into the process of completing their dissertation to complete their final degree, many considerations need to be made. The considerations start off with not only choosing a topic, but determining whether to use a qualitative, quantitative, or mixed method design. The type of study a researcher chooses to conduct will impact the way research is conducted. Both types of studies have similarities as well as important differences on how to move forward with the research. By reviewing the similarities and differences between the types of research, one can be chosen and best practices developed. There are many similarities between each of the study type of study method, but it’s the differences a researcher needs to keep in mind. The differences between study types need to be identified up front so the most appropriate approach can be utilized. Within this week’s assignment a discussion on the following areas will be discussed: (a) research and research type: similarities and differences, (b) research questions, (c) operational definitions, (d) null and alternate hypotheses, (e) source text books, and (f) verb tense, and (g) best practices. Research and Research Type: Similarities and Differences Research is defined as “the systematic process of collecting and analyzing information (data) in order to increase our understanding of the phenomenon about which we are concerned or interested” (Leedy & Ormrod, 2005). Conducting research and analyzing data to this point has served the purpose of developing and preparing students to conduct their own study. 3 Students are developed by understanding the basic foundation of how to conduct a research project from the start to finish. This week’s assignment allows students to analyze the similarities and differences of potential methodologies to develop an understanding of which will be utilized in the future dissertation process. The purpose of the dissertation will at minimum require a number of key points. Each study will establish casual relationships which will analyze a previously documented problem. By conducting an experiment or quasi­experimental study, the efficacy of the approach will be evaluated as well as both positive and negative aspects of the problem. An examination of the impacts of time on a study as well as the depth of the positive and negative aspects will be conducted. Methods to first identify the characteristics creating the documented problem as well as a discussion on what will decrease the impact of the problem will be established in this step (Ellis, & Levy, 2008). As process of creating a dissertation continues, a researcher must review the type of that is intended to be conducted within the research. The research is identified as quantitative, qualitative, or mixed method. The process of how the research is conducted has both similarities as well as differences. In the following sections, the similarities and differences between the research types will be discussed. After reviewing each of the methodologies, best practices can be identified. The way that a research study is approached is contingent upon the type of study that is chosen, qualitative or quantitative. Research Questions In quantitative studies the following are required: (a) research questions incorporated into the document, (b) contain a hypotheses aligned with the purpose statement, (c) contain questions 4 that must be answerable, and (d) hypotheses must be directly answerable, specific and testable. Quantitative studies collect that that are numerical by nature while quantitative data collects data in the form of text, photos, and sound bytes. The questions asked and they way they are asked is dependent upon the type of data a researcher is attempting to achieve. Qualitative data focus on questions that are open­ended while quantitative data is focused on closed and pointed questions. Qualitative studies focus on telling a through and descriptive story with words through the participant’s point of view, while quantitative studies provide a quantifiable analysis that can provide a system to analyze data. This type of study is similar in nature as the qualitative data is incorporates questions into the research. The questions must align with the purpose statement. The difference between the two types of studies is that qualitative study questions should be open­ended and avoid yes/no and closed ended questions. While both types of studies have strong points and specific reasons to use each, there may be cases where a mixed methodology would be the most effective. In this type of study, the researcher essentially must double the work needed to conduct the study. The data collected can be acquired all at once by utilizing a variety of methods, but the analysis will require different ways to translate and interpret the acquired data (Trochim & Donnelly, 2008). Operational Definitions If the proposed study is qualitative, the study does not identify operational definition of variables. Each of the constructs require a question, the hypotheses, an overview of how each will be operationally defined, as well how measurements will be conducted. If the proposed study is quantitative, operational definitions are not incorporated (Northcentral University Dissertation Center, 2013). 5 Null and Alternative Hypotheses Quantitative/mixed method studies are the only types of studies utilizing null and alternative hypotheses. This section will not be utilized in a qualitative study When conducting quantitative or mixed studies, the null and alternative hypotheses must be incorporated and bare direct correspondence (Northcentral University Dissertation Center, 2013). Source Text Books Throughout the initial courses, textbooks have been utilized to present factual content and guidance to the papers written. While these are the primary sources up until this point, a variety of sources are to be utilized from the concept paper forward. Instead of text books, each method will utilize an advanced commonly referenced source. Qualitative study resources are to utilize Shank’s Qualitative Research: A Personal Skills Approach and Patton’s Qualitative Research and Evaluation Methods. Quantitative Methodology Research focus upon utilizing Black’s Doing in the Social Sciences and Vogt’s Quantitative Research Methods for Professionals. If a mixed methodology is chosen, the sources to be utilized are Teddlie’s and Tashakkori’s Foundations of Mixed Methods Research: Integrating Quantitative and Qualitative. Verb Tense The simplest of concepts is the way the sentences are structure. Utilizing past tense to review the literature is primarily related to and utilized in quantitative studies. When developing the study, the focus answers questions that took place in the past. Present tense is indicative of qualitative studies. Researchers need to ensure that the same orientation is reflected throughout the study (Creswell, 2013). Best Practices 6 The chosen approach for my future study and concept paper is the qualitative approach. In order to identify a topic that is worthy of conducting a doctoral study, a number of additional steps must be taken. Choosing a dissertation topic appears to be one of the most complex portions of a research study. A best practice to follow is to pull recent dissertations that resemble the proposed study to identify research projects. By reviewing prior dissertations, a researcher can locate the gaps that still remain within the literature (Barnham, 2015). The planned topic for analysis has to do with global product launches and how to improve the overall process. The quantitative process allows for a full discovery of what makes a launch successful, how it is developed, and how the launch is created and utilized. Archival data and naturalistic observation are two methods that can be utilized for acquiring qualitative data (Cozby, 2012). Conclusion Developing a doctoral dissertation requires extensive research and an understanding on a wide variety of topics. Throughout the first half a student’s doctoral degree, foundation courses incorporating basic research methodologies and literature review are required. As each doctoral student enters into the process of completing their dissertation to complete their final degree, many considerations need to be made. The considerations start off with not only choosing a topic, but determining whether to use a qualitative, quantitative, or mixed method design. The type of study a researcher chooses to conduct will impact the way research is conducted. Both types of studies have similarities as well as important differences on how to move forward with the research. By reviewing the similarities and differences between the types of research, one can be chosen and best practices developed. There are many similarities between each of the 7 study type of study method, but it’s the differences a researcher needs to keep in mind. The differences between study types need to be identified up front so the most appropriate approach can be utilized. Within this week’s assignment a discussion on the following areas will be discussed: (a) research and research type: similarities and differences, (b) research questions, (c) operational definitions, (d) null and alternate hypotheses, (e) source text books, and (f) verb tense, and (g) best practices. 8 References Barnham, C. (2015). Quantitative and qualitative research. International Journal of Market Research, 57(6), 837-854. doi:10.2501/IJMR-2015-070 Best Practices for Concept Paper Development, Version 1.0 (2010). Retrieved from http://learners.ncu.edu/ncu_diss/default.aspx Cozby, P. C. (2012). Methods in behavioral research. 3rd ed. Boston, MA McGraw Hill Higher Education Creswell, J. W. (2013). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches. 4th ed. Thousand Oaks, CA Sage Publications Ellis, T. & Levy, Y. (2008). Framework of problem­based research: A guide for novice researchers on the development of a research­worthy problem. Retrieved from http://inform.nu/Articles/Vol11/ISJv11p017­033Ellis486.pdf Leedy, P. D., & Ormrod, J. E. (2005). Practical research: Planning and design (8th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall Northcentral University Dissertation Center. (2013). Applied Degree Concept Paper Template. Retrieved from http://learners.ncu.edu/ncu_diss/default.aspx Trochim, W., & Donnelly, J. (2008). The research methods knowledge base. Mason, OH Cengage

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Textbook: Explorations in College Algebra
Edition: 5
Author: Linda Almgren Kime
ISBN: 9780470466445

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The electrical resistance R (in ohms) of a wire is