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Solved: In Fig. 24-36a, a particle of elementary charge +e

Fundamentals of Physics Extended | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780470469088 | Authors: David Halliday ISBN: 9780470469088 189

Solution for problem 22 Chapter 24

Fundamentals of Physics Extended | 9th Edition

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Fundamentals of Physics Extended | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780470469088 | Authors: David Halliday

Fundamentals of Physics Extended | 9th Edition

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Problem 22

In Fig. 24-36a, a particle of elementary charge +e is initially at coordinate z = 20 nm on the dipole axis (here a z axis) through an electric dipole, on the positive side of the dipole. (The origin of z is at the center of the dipole.) The particle is then moved along a circular path around the dipole center until it is at coordinate z = -20 nm, on the negative side of the dipole axis. Figure 24-36b gives the work Wa done by the force moving the particle versus the angle () that locates the particle relative to the positive direction of the z axis. The scale of the vertical axis is set by Was = 4.0 X 10-30 J. What is the magnitude of the dipole moment?

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Creating systems that behave consistently move a design up the value pyramid.  Functionality (base)  function must be the first consideration, and design must meet the user’s basic needs  Design Staircase o Stage 1: No Design  Characterized by design playing no significant role in product or service development o Stage 2: Design as Styling  Design is used in a superficial way in terms of appearance (“design as decoration”) o Stage 3: Design as Process  Design is used as a process to develop new products or services o Stage 4: Design as Strategy  Design is integrated into a company’s culture and aligned with business goals Defining Value 1. Return on Investment  The most common and broadly used tool in establishing financial success in business is return on investment (ROI)  ROI is a basic measure for determining profits earned by a specific business investment  (Gain of Investment – Cost of Investment)/Cost of Investment X 100 = % ROI 2. Goals, Outputs, and Outcomes  A popular concept in business circles to help quickly clarify how design solutions meet business objectives  Setting success metrics by defining each project in terms of goals, outputs and outcomes o Goals: define why a project was commissioned and the purposes driving all associated actions o Outputs: sometimes referred to as “deliverables” outputs are tangible and help achieve project goals o Outcomes: the effects generated by outputs and should align with project goals and be measured upon project completion 3. Factfinder Report  Design council did a market analysis of the design sector – and complied it into a survey  HUGE return on investment 4. Design Effectiveness Industry Report  Design served business in two broadly defined categories, Functional and Experimental Design 5. The Economic Effect of Design  The report is one of the first studies to thoroughly document the critical role design plays in business success 6. The greater role in design , the stronger the return

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Chapter 24, Problem 22 is Solved
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Textbook: Fundamentals of Physics Extended
Edition: 9
Author: David Halliday
ISBN: 9780470469088

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Solved: In Fig. 24-36a, a particle of elementary charge +e