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A neutral conductor contains a hollow cavity in which

Physics for Scientists and Engineers: A Strategic Approach, Standard Edition (Chs 1-36) | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780134081496 | Authors: Randall D. Knight (Professor Emeritus) ISBN: 9780134081496 191

Solution for problem 24.62 Chapter 24

Physics for Scientists and Engineers: A Strategic Approach, Standard Edition (Chs 1-36) | 4th Edition

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Physics for Scientists and Engineers: A Strategic Approach, Standard Edition (Chs 1-36) | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780134081496 | Authors: Randall D. Knight (Professor Emeritus)

Physics for Scientists and Engineers: A Strategic Approach, Standard Edition (Chs 1-36) | 4th Edition

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Problem 24.62

A neutral conductor contains a hollow cavity in which there is a +100 nC point charge. A charged rod then transfers -50 nC to the conductor. Afterward, what is the charge (a) on the inner wall of the cavity, and (b) on the exterior surface of the conductor?

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MIDTERM AND FINAL REVIEW AND GUIDE Corrections  Refers to all programs, services, facilities and organizations responsible for the management of the accused and convicted  Prisons jails probation parole halfway houses education and work release programs community service  70-75 billion a year spent in the us  Us has less than 5% of worlds population but almost 25% of worlds prisoners  1 in 100 adults were behind bars in prisons and jails  Total 7.5 million adults and juveniles under “corrections” History of Corrections  Penitentiary- an institution intended to punish criminals by isolating them from society so they can reflect on their crimes and reform The Pennsylvania System  Criminals could best be reformed if they were placed in penitentiaries  Separate confinement – inmates held in isolation from other inmates  Solitary confinement – would prevent further corruption New York System (rival)  Congregate system: prisoners held in isolation at night but worked with other prisoners in shops during the day  Worked under rule of silence and forbidden from even looking at each other  Industrial efficiency should be purpose of prisoners  Contract labor system : labor sold on a contractual basis to private employers private employers provided the equip. And inmates made products to sell. Cincinnati 1870:  Advocated new design for the penitentiary system  Reform should be rewarded by release  Indeterminate sentencing guidelines, instead of fixed sentences Corrections in the US  Each level of gov’t has some responsibilities for corrections  State and local gov’t pay about 90% of the cost of all correctional activities in the nation Models of incarceration  Custodial model : emphasizes security discipline and order  Rehabilitation : emphasizes treatment on drugs  Reintegration : emphasizes ties to families and communities Federal Bureau of Prisons  Created 1930 congress  Facilities and inmates are classified by security range  Level 1 least secure  Level 5 most secure  Penitentiary at Florence Colorado  ADX Florence – “Alcatraz of the rockies” State Correctional systems  40 states have created prisons that exceed maximum security  About 20K inmates are currently held in super max prisons. Probation ends in 1 of two ways  Offender successfully completes the period of probation  Probationary status to revoke because of a tech. violation  Once done sentence ends Parole  Provisional release from prison  Main goals- managing prison populations and incentivizing rehab. Types of intermediate sanctions 1. Fines: sum of money to be paid to the state by a convicted person as punishment for an offense. 2. Restitution- repayment to a victim who has suffered loss of the offense 3. Forfeiture- gov’t seizure property and other assets derived in criminal activity 4. Home confinement is another 5. Community service 6. Day Reporting Centers: Community correctional center where an offender reports each day to comply with elements of a sentence Private Prisons  Response to prison and jail overcrowding and rising costs  Argue that private enterprise can build and run prisons as effectively as gov’t but at lower cost to taxpayers  Private facilities hold approximately 6% of all state prisoners and 15% of all federal prisoners  Guaranteed occupancy rates Jails  Jails are used for detention and short term incarceration  Local facilities used to detain people awaiting trial  Also serve as a holding facility for social misfits  Super max- Colorado ADX Florence**** The contemporary jail  Approx. 3400 jails in the US  Because of constant inmate turnover they lack correctional services in jail  The mixture of offenders of differing ages and criminal histories is also a major problem Community Corrections  Community corrections seeks to build stability and success for offenders through the community  Finding employment opp is an imp. Component of community corretions  Based on the goal of finding “least restrictive alternative” Probation  Conditional release into the community  Submitting to drug tests, obeying curfews and staying away from certain people or parts of town  About 4.2 million offenders currently on probation Probation Officers  Thought of as police officers and social worker  Supervise clients to keep them out of trouble and enforce the sentence  Helps clients obtain housing, employment, and treatment services Caseloads  National prob association recommended a 50 unit caseload  Presidents commission on law enforcement reduced it to a 35 caseload Casey Anthony Case  Was found not guilty for first degree murder  Nor child abuse and aggravated man slaughter  Casey – mom  George and Cindy – grandparents  Cylee – child who died  Jose Byas – main defense attorney for Anthony Key Evidence  Strand of hair in the trunk  “air sampling procedure”  Same testing showed chloroform was found  Google search “chloroform”  Caylee’s remains found on December 11,2008  Found in trash bag with blanket and duct tape  CAUSE OF DEATH WAS UNDETERMINED Defense  Accidental drowning in family swimming pool  George Anthony disposed of the body  Defense said that casey lied because of her dysfunctional family  “fantasy forensics” – very little evidence to go on. Prosecution  Big mistakes made from them 1. Over-trying Casey Anthony 2. Over –Charging her  Caylee’s law was created and wanted to impose stricter requirements on parents to notify law when their child disappears or dies.  Felony is a parents or legal guardian fails to report a missing child in a timely manner New Evidence

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Chapter 24, Problem 24.62 is Solved
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Textbook: Physics for Scientists and Engineers: A Strategic Approach, Standard Edition (Chs 1-36)
Edition: 4
Author: Randall D. Knight (Professor Emeritus)
ISBN: 9780134081496

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A neutral conductor contains a hollow cavity in which