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Answer: Sucrose (C12H22O11), commonly called table sugar,

Chemistry | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780078021510 | Authors: Raymond Chang; Kenneth Goldsby ISBN: 9780078021510 98

Solution for problem 13.111 Chapter 13

Chemistry | 12th Edition

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Chemistry | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780078021510 | Authors: Raymond Chang; Kenneth Goldsby

Chemistry | 12th Edition

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Problem 13.111

Sucrose (C12H22O11), commonly called table sugar, undergoes hydrolysis (reaction with water) to produce fructose (C6H12O6) and glucose (C6H12O6): C12H22O11 1 H2O C6H12O6 1 C6H12O6 fructose glucose This reaction is of considerable importance in the candy industry. First, fructose is sweeter than sucrose. Second, a mixture of fructose and glucose, called invert sugar, does not crystallize, so the candy containing this sugar would be chewy rather than brittle as candy containing sucrose crystals would be. (a) From the following data determine the order of the reaction. (b) How long does it take to hydrolyze 95 percent of sucrose? (c) Explain why the rate law does not include [H2O] even though water is a reactant. Time (min) [C12H22O11] 0 0.500 60.0 0.400 96.4 0.350 157.5 0.280

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Controlled-Potential Coulometry Ashley Lovins Lab Partners: Ethan Dubbels, Derek Fields, & Henry Worley 02/20/2017 Determination of Copper in Sample Submitted 02/27/2017 Abstract: Controlled-potential coulometry was used to determine the efficiency of which copper was deposited onto the platinum gauze electrode. This was determined by first calculating the amount of copper expected from the moles of electrons flowing through the cell. After the experiment was finished the platinum gauze electrode was weighted which gave the experimental value of copper. By dividing the expected amount of copper by the experimental value of copper then multiplying by 100%, it was determined that the experiment had an 88% efficiency. Introduction: C

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Chapter 13, Problem 13.111 is Solved
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Textbook: Chemistry
Edition: 12
Author: Raymond Chang; Kenneth Goldsby
ISBN: 9780078021510

The full step-by-step solution to problem: 13.111 from chapter: 13 was answered by , our top Chemistry solution expert on 09/09/17, 04:35AM. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry, edition: 12. The answer to “Sucrose (C12H22O11), commonly called table sugar, undergoes hydrolysis (reaction with water) to produce fructose (C6H12O6) and glucose (C6H12O6): C12H22O11 1 H2O C6H12O6 1 C6H12O6 fructose glucose This reaction is of considerable importance in the candy industry. First, fructose is sweeter than sucrose. Second, a mixture of fructose and glucose, called invert sugar, does not crystallize, so the candy containing this sugar would be chewy rather than brittle as candy containing sucrose crystals would be. (a) From the following data determine the order of the reaction. (b) How long does it take to hydrolyze 95 percent of sucrose? (c) Explain why the rate law does not include [H2O] even though water is a reactant. Time (min) [C12H22O11] 0 0.500 60.0 0.400 96.4 0.350 157.5 0.280” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 124 words. Since the solution to 13.111 from 13 chapter was answered, more than 753 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. Chemistry was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780078021510. This full solution covers the following key subjects: . This expansive textbook survival guide covers 25 chapters, and 3241 solutions.

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Answer: Sucrose (C12H22O11), commonly called table sugar,