×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Precalculus: Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic - 8th edition Edition - Chapter 2.2 - Problem 2.1.1.126
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Precalculus: Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic - 8th edition Edition - Chapter 2.2 - Problem 2.1.1.126

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

Answer: In Exercises 1722, write the statement as a power

Precalculus: Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780321656933 | Authors: Franklin Demana, Bert K. Waits, Gregory D. Foley, Daniel Kennedy, Dave Bock ISBN: 9780321656933 190

Solution for problem 2.1.1.126 Chapter 2.2

Precalculus: Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic | 8th Edition

  • Textbook Solutions
  • 2901 Step-by-step solutions solved by professors and subject experts
  • Get 24/7 help from StudySoup virtual teaching assistants
Precalculus: Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780321656933 | Authors: Franklin Demana, Bert K. Waits, Gregory D. Foley, Daniel Kennedy, Dave Bock

Precalculus: Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic | 8th Edition

4 5 1 384 Reviews
30
2
Problem 2.1.1.126

In Exercises 1722, write the statement as a power function equation. Use k for the constant of variation if one is not given. The energy E produced in a nuclear reaction is proportional to the mass m, with the constant of variation being , the square of the speed of light.

Step-by-Step Solution:
Step 1 of 3

Chapter 8: Courtroom Participants and the Trail Monday, February 29, 2016 9:39 AM Charging and Pre-Trail Proceedings • The ChargingDecision • Arguably the most important discretionary decision for the Prosecutor • Bordenkircher vs Hayes (1978) • Reasons a Prosecutor would not charge: ○ Insufficient evidence ○ Beliefin the inability to gaina conviction ○ Office policy • Pre-Trial Events ○ Information vs Indictment ○ Booking ○ Initial appearance ○ Arraignment ○ Pre-Trail Motions ○ Pleabargaining • Pre-trail motions ○ Motion for Discovery: Filed by the defense requesting that the prosecution turn over all relevantevidence that it might use at trail ○ Motion for Suppression: Filedby the defense to exclude certain evidence at trail ○ Motion for Change of Venue: Canbe made by either the defense or prosecution requesting that a trail be moved to another ○ Motion for Continuance: Can be made by either the defense or prosecution to delay the start of a trail ○ Motion for Severance of Charges or Defendants: A request that the defendant be tried on multiple charges separately or that multiple defendants be tried separately ○ Motion for Competency: Simply a motion to determine whether a defendant is competent to stand trail • Plea Bargaining ○ Background ○ Most criminal cases today are settled through the pleabargaining process, so understanding the process isessential ○ Santobello vs New York (1971) ○ It is a guilty pleaby a defendant in exchange for some concessions from the prosecutor • Charge Reductions vs Sentence Agreements ○ Charge Reduction: An agreementthat the prosecution will reduce or drop some charges ○ Sentence Agreement:An agreementthat the prosecution willreduce the sentence to be served • Effects on Judicial Discretion ○ Charge Reduction - a judge generally cannot refuse to accept a pleaagreement between a prosecutor and defense ○ Sentence Agreements - if the prosecution and defense agree to a reduced sentence, the judge generally must accept the agreement • Competency to Stand Trail: a defendant is incompetent to stand trial when for some reason, whether physical or mental impairment, the defendant isnot able to adequately assist in his or her own defense • Excessive Bail ○ No direct rightto bail ○ No precise definitionof excessive bail, determinedon a case by case basis • Denial of Bail • Bail bonds can be denied or revokedat any time ○ Administeredby independent, for-profit companies ○ Companies guarantee that defendants willshow up to court ○ Defendant pays a certain percentage of bail to the company ○ Bail bondsmen can refuse to serve a defendant • Release on Recognizance (ROR): Non-monetary, a defendant's promise to return • Unsecured Bond: A promise to pay an agreedupon amount if the defendant does not return for proceedings • Signature Bond: Release of the defendant by police after being charged with the promise to show up for court WednesdayMarch 2, 2016 Charging and Pre-Trail Proceedings • Effective Assistance of Counsel ○ McMann vs Richardson (1970): Right to counsel means a right to effective assistance of counsel ○ Strickland vs Washington (1984): Two-pronged test for competence 1. Was the attorney's performance deficient 2. Did the deficient performance injure the defendant Trail • Right to speedy trail Notes Page 1 • Right to speedy trail ○ Right to a speedy trail is a 6th amendmentright ○ May change depending on whether the defendant is in custody or on pre-trail release ○ Many defendants, however, waive their rightto a speedy trail (witness memoryfades, gather evidence, heat cools down) ○ For those defendants who request a speedy trail and do not waive the right, constitutional violationsmay occur ifcertain deadlines are not met, Bakervs Wingo (1972) ○ Speedy Trail Act of 1974: at federal level, 30 day time limitbetween arrest and indictment and 70 day limitbetween indictment and trail • Juries and Jury Selection ○ 6th amendment to Constitution expands upon Article III, Section 2 in a key way: requires an impartial jury ○ Traditionally, 12 person juries have been the norm dating back to common law England ○ Constitutionally, however, juries are permitted to be smaller(as few as 6) ○ 3 major steps to jury selection: 1. Developing a list of potential jurors 2. Jury panel: individualsbrought in for interviews 3. Voir Dire: process of questioning potential jurors ○ Strikes for Cause: either the defense or the prosecution excluding a potential juror for a particular reason, strikes are unlimited ○ Preemptory Strikes: either the defense or the prosecution excluding a potential juror for no reason at all, strikes limitedto 4 or 5 Opening Statements • Following rulingson all pretrial motions, the prosecutor and defense attorney engage in opening statements • Topics covered by prosecution: charges, crime & evidence, proof of elements of crime, defendant's motivation, victim impacts • Topics covered by the defense: presumption of innocence, prosecutorial burden of proof, role of the jury Presentation of Evidence • Prosecution typically goes first • Defense followsby moving for a "directed verdict" ○ Motion granted: defendant is acquitted ○ Motion denied: defense moves to presentation of evidence • Defense is not required to prove a defendant's innocence nor isthe defense required to present evidence • Questioning Witnesses: ○ Direct Examination: a witness is questioned by the side that called the witness ○ Cross-Examination: a witness isquestioned by the opposing side following direct examination • CallingWitnesses ○ Privilegeagainst self-incrimination ○ It has long been understood that defendants cannot be compelledto testify against themselves,even though they do retain the right to take the stand in their own defense • Types of Evidence ○ Direct Evidence: evidence that tends to prove or disprove a fact at issue in a case (eyewitness testimony, confession) ○ Indirect Evidence: also known as circumstantial evidence, requiresjudges and juries make inferences about what took place or the defendant's role (fingerprintsfound in a car) Friday March 4, 2016 Trail • Objecting to the introduction of evidence ○ Commonreasons for objecting to admissionof evidence or statements: lack of relevance, witness is incompetent, witness not qualifiedto give an opinion on a matter, hearsay ○ HearsayEvidence is generally not admissible in trials, although there are some common exceptions to this rule  Dying Declaration  Excited Utterance • Closing Arguments ○ Prosecution and defense each take their opportunity to summarize the case to the jury ○ Key Rules:  Prosecutors may not comment on a defendant's unwillingnessto testify or make inflammatorycomments about the defendant  Only evidence presented at trial may be discussed  Defense attorneys may not question the credibility of the prosecutor or any of the state's witnesses Notes Page 2

Step 2 of 3

Chapter 2.2, Problem 2.1.1.126 is Solved
Step 3 of 3

Textbook: Precalculus: Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic
Edition: 8th Edition
Author: Franklin Demana, Bert K. Waits, Gregory D. Foley, Daniel Kennedy, Dave Bock
ISBN: 9780321656933

Other solutions

People also purchased

Related chapters

Unlock Textbook Solution

Enter your email below to unlock your verified solution to:

Answer: In Exercises 1722, write the statement as a power