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The report Fatality Facts 2004: Bicycles (Insurance

Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis (with CengageNOW Printed Access Card) (Available Titles CengageNOW) | 3rd Edition | ISBN: 9780495118732 | Authors: Roxy Peck, Chris Olsen, Jay L. Devore ISBN: 9780495118732 197

Solution for problem 12.6 Chapter Chapter 12

Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis (with CengageNOW Printed Access Card) (Available Titles CengageNOW) | 3rd Edition

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Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis (with CengageNOW Printed Access Card) (Available Titles CengageNOW) | 3rd Edition | ISBN: 9780495118732 | Authors: Roxy Peck, Chris Olsen, Jay L. Devore

Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis (with CengageNOW Printed Access Card) (Available Titles CengageNOW) | 3rd Edition

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Problem 12.6

The report Fatality Facts 2004: Bicycles (Insurance Institute, 2004) included the following table classifying 715 fatal bicycle accidents according to time of day the accident occurred. a. Assume it is reasonable to regard the 715 bicycle accidents summarized in the table as a random sample of fatal bicycle accidents in 2004. Do these data support the hypothesis that fatal bicycle accidents are not equally likely to occur in each of the 3-hour time periods used to construct the table? Test the relevant hypotheses using a significance level of .05. b. Suppose a safety office proposes that bicycle fatalities are twice as likely to occur between noon and midnight as during midnight to noon and suggests the following hypothesis: H0: p1 1/3, p2 2/3, where p1 is the proportion of accidents occurring between midnight and noon and p2 is the proportion occurring between noon and midnight. Do the given data provide evidence against this hypothesis, or are the data consistent with it? Justify your answer with an appropriate test. (Hint: Use the data to construct a one-way table with just two time categories.)

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Chapter 1 Statistics: The Art and Science of Learning From Data 1.1 Using Data to Answer Statistical Questions What is statistics The art and science of learning from data — designing studies, analyzing the data, and translating data into knowledge and understanding of the world around us. Who uses statistics It seems that nearly everyone in every field uses statistics in some way shape or form. Some popular examples are sports, medical studies, and marketing. In sports, players are analyzed and give “stats” which represent how good or bad they are at something. Baseball relies on players batting averages to determine how well they perform when hitting. Medical studies utilize statistics almost every day. They use them when determining how effective a treatment is compared to a pre

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Chapter Chapter 12, Problem 12.6 is Solved
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Textbook: Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis (with CengageNOW Printed Access Card) (Available Titles CengageNOW)
Edition: 3
Author: Roxy Peck, Chris Olsen, Jay L. Devore
ISBN: 9780495118732

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The report Fatality Facts 2004: Bicycles (Insurance