×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Statistics For Business And Economics - 12 Edition - Chapter 9 - Problem 21e
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Statistics For Business And Economics - 12 Edition - Chapter 9 - Problem 21e

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

The data in the next table resulted from an experiment

Statistics for Business and Economics | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321826237 | Authors: James T. McClave, P. George Benson, Terry T Sincich ISBN: 9780321826237 51

Solution for problem 21E Chapter 9

Statistics for Business and Economics | 12th Edition

  • Textbook Solutions
  • 2901 Step-by-step solutions solved by professors and subject experts
  • Get 24/7 help from StudySoup virtual teaching assistants
Statistics for Business and Economics | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321826237 | Authors: James T. McClave, P. George Benson, Terry T Sincich

Statistics for Business and Economics | 12th Edition

4 5 1 353 Reviews
13
1
Problem 21E

Problem 21E

The data in the next table resulted from an experiment that used a completely randomized design.

a. Use statistical software (or the appropriate calculation formulas in Appendix C) to complete the following ANOVA table:

b. Test the null hypothesis that µ1 = µ2 = µ3, where µi represents the true mean for treatment i, against the alternative that at least two of the means differ. Use α = .01.

Step-by-Step Solution:
Step 1 of 3

Week 5: Classical vs Operant Conditioning: (2/22, 2/24, 2/26)  how do we know we are learning “expectation” -because, the conditioned response (CR) is often quite different than the unconditioned response (UCR)  we learn by Prediction!  What type of condition helps us to predict o Unconditioned stimulus comes first before the unconditioned stimulus =good prediction o In a Redundant scenario= there are redundant predictors which the conditioned stimulus rarely appears= an idea that is already established ==blocking the new conditioned stimulus o Emotion can be Classically Conditioned  Operant Conditioning: -Thorndike’s Law of Effect -the responses that are produces to have a good effect will then be repeated. Ex: the cat opens the door to get out of the box and reaches the food -the response that produce negative effects will then not be repeated. Ex: Cat scratches at the box, thus not figuring out how to escape Skinner’s Operant Conditioning -created an experiment using a rat and in a box. The rat places in the box, learned how to push down a lever and release a food pellet. BehaviorConsequences --Don’t get hung up on the ideas of “good” and “bad” -in this context, “consequence” and “punishment” are not always implying a negative action. Instead the act of something in response to a stimuli. In the same way, “positive” meaning that there is the add on of a new stimulus and “negative” meaning that a stimulus is being taken away. Reinforcement Punishment Positive Positive (get the stimulus) (the arrival of a stimulus) Reinforcement Punishment Negative Negative (remove the stimulus) (the taking away of a stimulus) Q #1: will the behavior increase Q #2: As a result of behavior, or decrease (reinforce or are they receiving (positive) or punish) having something taken away (negative) (these are examples used from class) Ex: Every time Jane gets an A on her test, her parents take her out to dinner; hoping this will encourage her to continue getting A’s. -using the table, how would you classify this scenario  Answer: Positive Reinforcement “Jane gets an A” = behavior “parents take her out to dinner” = consequence (result) -Jane is being given something (dinner) in a positive way. Ex: When Katie gets an A on her test, her parents allow her to skip doing the dishes for a week; which is a chore she really dislikes.  Answer: Negative Reinforcement = by getting an A (behavior continue) her parents removed the chore (negative consequence- b/cuz its being taken away) -“gets an A on her test” = behavior -“skip doing the dishes” = consequence  Implementing Operant Processing: o Trying to choose a behavior (less successful behaviors with successful one) -Eliciting Behaviors: need to address that behavior a. Prompting- verbal reminders: telling a kid to say “thank you” -behavior -> you give the consequence b. Shaping – reinforcing successful closer to the desired response until it occurs Ex: teaching dog a trick (rolling over) that has multiple steps Ex: dancing, athletics (when a person is stuck and need help to further shapes it) -Scheduling Reinforcement: -continuous reinforcement ------(partial schedules)----- extinction (to establish/teach a new behavior) (sometimes) (Never get reinforced)

Step 2 of 3

Chapter 9, Problem 21E is Solved
Step 3 of 3

Textbook: Statistics for Business and Economics
Edition: 12
Author: James T. McClave, P. George Benson, Terry T Sincich
ISBN: 9780321826237

This full solution covers the following key subjects: Table, use, mean, appendix, appropriate. This expansive textbook survival guide covers 15 chapters, and 1631 solutions. Statistics for Business and Economics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321826237. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Statistics for Business and Economics , edition: 12. Since the solution to 21E from 9 chapter was answered, more than 283 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 21E from chapter: 9 was answered by , our top Business solution expert on 07/21/17, 05:42AM. The answer to “The data in the next table resulted from an experiment that used a completely randomized design. a. Use statistical software (or the appropriate calculation formulas in Appendix C) to complete the following ANOVA table: b. Test the null hypothesis that µ1 = µ2 = µ3, where µi represents the true mean for treatment i, against the alternative that at least two of the means differ. Use ? = .01.” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 69 words.

Other solutions

People also purchased

Related chapters

Unlock Textbook Solution

Enter your email below to unlock your verified solution to:

The data in the next table resulted from an experiment